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  #1  
Old 10-09-2014, 02:57 PM
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Charles Charles is online now
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Est 800,000 Killer Bees Kill Landscaper. Others

Injured. Might as well had killed me because I would never leave the house again:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/m...injure-others/

"A swarm of bees from a hive estimated to hold 800,000 attacked four landscapers Wednesday morning in southern Arizona, leaving one dead and another critically injured.

The men had been mowing grass and weeding for a 90-year-old homeowner in Douglas, Ariz., when the insects emerged from a 3-by-8-foot hive in an attic and attacked the crew, the Douglas Fire Department said. One man died at a nearby hospital. “A witness said his face and neck were covered with bees,” Capt. Ray Luzania told Tucson.com."

The other man, who was stung more than 100 times, was treated at the hospital and released.

Two other workers who were stung refused treatment and a neighbor, who was also stung, drove to the hospital................."
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Old 10-09-2014, 03:19 PM
caseysmowing caseysmowing is online now
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No way the homeowner didnt know about the nest even if they were 90 years old. It takes a long time to build that big of a nest and I wouldn't refuse treatment if my co worker just died. Crazy!
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Old 10-09-2014, 03:26 PM
larryinalabama larryinalabama is online now
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Were they able to get any honey?
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Old 10-09-2014, 03:42 PM
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Charles Charles is online now
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The Honey was probably laced with poison used to kill the bees?. Yea it is a wonder the homeowner hadn't been attacked before this happened. I wonder what set the bees off? Scary that is may have been just outside equipment noise
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Old 10-09-2014, 05:18 PM
RussellB RussellB is online now
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I don't think they were honey bees. I feel bad for the guys and witnesses.
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  #6  
Old 10-09-2014, 05:21 PM
larryinalabama larryinalabama is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
I wonder what set the bees off?
They were protecting the honey.
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  #7  
Old 10-09-2014, 05:31 PM
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Africanized_bee
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  #8  
Old 10-10-2014, 01:35 AM
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weeze weeze is offline
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needed a lake or pool to jump into. bees don't dive underwater.
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Old 10-10-2014, 06:36 AM
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Killer bees wait until you come up. They nasty
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Old 10-10-2014, 09:26 AM
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Mr. Force™, Billy Goat Industries Mr. Force™, Billy Goat Industries is online now
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I'm a sideline beekeeper with 25 hives. A top producing hive has between 60 to 80K bees in it. I wish I had a hive of 800K. During nectar flow that would produce honey like a faucet. But they simply can't have that many in a hive. They depend on the pheromone scent of the queen to be at a certain level. If the level gets too low due to too many bees in the hive they'll starts new queens in swarm cells. The hive population then breaks up in swarms as the queens emerge.

A "swarm" is a mass of bees (normally about 3#'s or +/-10K) with a queen looking for a new home. They are normally docile and I catch them regularly in the spring. A hive is an established nest. Bees will defend a hive aggressively especially if there's no food sources to collect.

Without gear and especially without a lit smoker even a strong non-African hive could light you up with serious results if you don't know how to react to an attack. There's no way to tell if the were African killer bees unless a sample of them are sent off to the Beltsville, MD bee lab to be genetically tested. They're sadly killer bees either way though....
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