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  #1  
Old 08-13-2013, 03:36 PM
jus10 jus10 is offline
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Location: Battle Ground, IN
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Herbicide advice needed

A question for the experts: I've got a 2.5 acre lot with about 1 acre of newly seeded lawn (planted about 90 days ago). The newly seeded areas have quite a bit of crabgrass and clover. What chemical would you recommend, Q4? Is it okay to use on new lawns? The plan is to overseed mid/late-September.

Thanks in advance for your advice.
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  #2  
Old 08-13-2013, 08:34 PM
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RigglePLC RigglePLC is online now
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In theory you can apply 28 days after seedling emergence or after the second mowing. See the label. Top right of page 2.
http://www.pbigordon.com/pdfs/Q4-SL.pdf

You should plan to overseed a bit sooner if possible--warm soil temperatures cause rapid emergence of new seedlings. Try to seed 8 weeks before frost in your town. See Farmer's Almanac. Seed when temps drop below 85. Irrigate every day. If no irrigation, seed immediately after or before a good rain. Naturally rainy weather is a big help--just not predictable. Be sure to apply the correct amount. Crabgrass is not extremely important--as it will stop growing when night temps hit about 45, and die at the first frost. Naturally, if crabgrass is heavy, if will interfere to a degree with getting the seed down so that seed-to-soil contact is established.

Be sure to plan on a good crabgrass control in spring, April. Use the maximum rate or two applications to be sure.
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Old 08-14-2013, 11:18 AM
jus10 jus10 is offline
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Thanks Riggle. I looked at the label but totally missed the newly seeded area part.

Normal first frost date for my part of Indiana is the end of September/1st of October. So, I should overseed right away?

I stumbled upon this while doing some research:
"Any areas that show bare soil or have a high concentration of crabgrass should be seeded in the fall. Surprisingly, it is not necessary to remove the crabgrass plants currently growing in the lawn prior to seeding. The mature and naturally dying crabgrass plants will protect the new desirable grass by stabilizing moisture and temperatures. Competition from crabgrass seedlings will not occur until the following spring."

Any truth to not killing off the crabgrass first? My thoughts are the same as yours, but if the seed can get in the ground then you should be okay, right?
Even if I did kill the crabgrass, the dead crabgrass will still be there when it comes time to overseed. Would that interfere with the seed getting into the ground? Plan is to rent an overseeder...slicer?

Also, I'll have to wait 4 weeks after applying the Q4, that will put the overseed date within a couple weeks of the potential first frost.

Not trying to talk myself out of the Q4, just want to choose the right method.

What chemical do you recommend for crabgrass control next spring?

Thanks again!
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Old 08-14-2013, 11:32 AM
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RigglePLC RigglePLC is online now
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You need to seed now, if you expect frost in only 6 weeks. The new grass is not injured by frost, but will not grow much after frost. A slit seeder is a good option.
OR...you could just try short mowing, followed by very short mowing; this will remove most of the crabgrass. It should allow you to get the seed into the soil and get seed to soil contact. You will have lots of grass clippings and crabgrass residue. You can use that like straw covering if you want. You will have a few million crabgrass seeds in various states of maturity; treat for crabgrass in spring.

Dimension crabgrass works very well--dithiopyr. Treat about the date of the first mowing.
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Old 08-14-2013, 01:07 PM
jus10 jus10 is offline
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Thanks for your help!
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Old 08-15-2013, 10:56 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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If you have irrigation in October you can seed the lawn after the CG freezes to death anyways... Frost doesn't affect the grasses if they are cool season grasses... if you can get them to germinate before the ground freezes solid,,, they'll be fine and take right off in the Spring... Whatever doesn't get germinated this Fall, add some more seed just before the first permanent Snow Storm...

I have one section of lawn that was killed during the drought and over taken by CG, last year... I waited for it to die and overseeded several times but the rain was all we had to work with when the irrigation was winterized and off... This year only the CG came back, so I'm killing it now and hope to get seed worked in before we lose the irrigation this season...
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