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  #1  
Old 08-19-2013, 06:18 PM
1toomanyhobbies 1toomanyhobbies is offline
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Tow Behind Aerators?

I get the impression most people don't like tow behind aerators. I am looking at doing leaf cleanup part time this fall and thinking about getting a tow behind aerator to offer as an additional service. I know with tow behinds you would have to run over the property twice but if it is behind a ZTR, is it really going to take much time?

I am looking a used billy goat only used one season with asking price of $1200. I know that is a professional quality but wondering if I could go with an Ohio Steel professional unit http://www.northerntool.com/shop/too...8157_200418157. I know the Ohio won't last as long but I figure it is a lower entry point for a service that at most Ill probably do 10 yards this fall.

So I guess I'm really asking two questions. 1) If I am willing to run over yard twice, is there anything wrong with tow behind? 2) Do you think the Ohio Steel unit I listed work or do I really need to be looking at the used Billy Goat?
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  #2  
Old 08-19-2013, 11:15 PM
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ProStreetCamaro ProStreetCamaro is offline
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We use a JD aerator behind our ztr and the darn thing works great. It pulls deep plugs and is built heavy duty enough it will last us for years. It was actually cheaper at the local JD dealer and that is where I bought ours.



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Old 08-19-2013, 11:29 PM
Ridin' Green Ridin' Green is offline
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I have the 48" JD plugger. It is made by Brinly Hardy, but to JD's much heavier duty specs, and it is a solid unit. It works great. I've had it for several years, and as long as I take care of it (which I do) it'll last me a long time to come. I pull it behind an old JD garden tractor instead of my ZTR. The 48" model has a lot of spoons, and when they sink in good ( I use 252 lbs of suitcase weights on the tray), it puts a load on the tow unit, thus the reason I use my GT which is built for that type thing.
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Old 09-03-2013, 10:52 AM
seabee003 seabee003 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridin' Green View Post
I have the 48" JD plugger. It is made by Brinly Hardy, but to JD's much heavier duty specs, and it is a solid unit. It works great. I've had it for several years, and as long as I take care of it (which I do) it'll last me a long time to come. I pull it behind an old JD garden tractor instead of my ZTR. The 48" model has a lot of spoons, and when they sink in good ( I use 252 lbs of suitcase weights on the tray), it puts a load on the tow unit, thus the reason I use my GT which is built for that type thing.
How do you secure the suitcase weights?
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Old 09-03-2013, 10:59 AM
Ridin' Green Ridin' Green is offline
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I lay them on an old cargo blanket inside the built-on weight tray.
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  #6  
Old 09-03-2013, 11:31 AM
seabee003 seabee003 is offline
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Thnx, I thought you might have something more exotic like a braket etc to attach the weights. Sometimes, simple is best! .

I use fetilizer bags held in with bungee cords (~150-160 lbs) but I may try your idea as I like the convenience of using the suitcase weights. Do the weights want to jump out when you are on a hill or riding fast? I use a 4x6 Gator and can go faster than tractors or Z's. I know Deere recommends 3-5 mph but in my experience you get somewhat better (deeper) plugs the faster you go.
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Old 09-03-2013, 01:10 PM
Ridin' Green Ridin' Green is offline
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It's just the opposite for me, at least IME, regarding speed. I can go much faster, but I have repeatedly watched the plugs as they go in and they always go deeper when I go slower. I usually plug at 3-4 MPH.

I don't have any issues with the weights at that speed either, but I could see that it might be possible for problems to arise if I did speed up. Another reason I go slow is to give the spoons time to rise up and over shallow roots. Going faster can bend them a lot easier. I use three 70#'er's and one 42#'er, so they stay in place pretty well.
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Old 09-03-2013, 01:10 PM
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ProStreetCamaro ProStreetCamaro is offline
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We just set 4 solid concrete blocks on top of ours. We dont even fasten them down. Never had one jump off.



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  #9  
Old 09-03-2013, 03:15 PM
seabee003 seabee003 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridin' Green View Post
It's just the opposite for me, at least IME, regarding speed. I can go much faster, but I have repeatedly watched the plugs as they go in and they always go deeper when I go slower. I usually plug at 3-4 MPH.

I don't have any issues with the weights at that speed either, but I could see that it might be possible for problems to arise if I did speed up. Another reason I go slow is to give the spoons time to rise up and over shallow roots. Going faster can bend them a lot easier. I use three 70#'er's and one 42#'er, so they stay in place pretty well.
One thing for sure about speed, if you hit solid rock with one tine taking the brunt, it's lifetime is short. I don't think I understand your comment re the shallow roots and speed, but I am going to try slower to see if my perception of speed and depth was wrong. Also you are using a lot more weight and that may be the best approach to getting depth (or course all assuing the soil moisture is right -- not too wet and certainly not dry).

Thnx for comments.
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  #10  
Old 09-03-2013, 03:23 PM
Ridin' Green Ridin' Green is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seabee003 View Post
One thing for sure about speed, if you hit solid rock with one tine taking the brunt, it's lifetime is short. I don't think I understand your comment re the shallow roots and speed, but I am going to try slower to see if my perception of speed and depth was wrong. Also you are using a lot more weight and that may be the best approach to getting depth (or course all assuing the soil moisture is right -- not too wet and certainly not dry).

Thnx for comments.
Your sentence right before the one in bold is what I meant about hitting shallow roots at faster speeds. Rarely does more than one tine/spoon per spider hit a root at the same time to help spread the load, thus you end up with damaged spoons as you stated.
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