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  #1  
Old 07-16-2011, 08:40 PM
lakesregionscapes lakesregionscapes is offline
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Confirming fungus outbreak?

Went to retrieve a forgotten pair of pruners yesterday, and discovered that a seed lawn we installed last fall, that was looking great a month ago, just developed in the last 48 hours whitish-tan lines that match the mower tire lines perfectly, in addition to what was looking like drought/heat stressed irregular areas - some shade, some full sun... The irregular patches were there 3 days ago: the mowing lines appeared since.
Some internet research points to brown patch - Rhizoctonia solani - but the images don't really match: we don't really have circles or patches per se, nor visible mycelium, and the dead grass is almost white. We've definitely had the high heat and humidity - in the 90's and sticky for days on end, and lawns are heat and drought stressed too.
The individual blades that aren't all white look like the picture below - one of these was new crabgrass sprouts at the road edge...

Anyone have any other possible explanations for these lines, besides tires tracking fungus, or any other fungus? I know drought damage tire lines - this is not it.
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  #2  
Old 07-17-2011, 08:40 AM
dgw dgw is offline
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dollar spot/leaf spot, probably both


some nitrogen and a watering schedule should fix it up
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Last edited by dgw; 07-17-2011 at 08:46 AM.
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  #3  
Old 07-17-2011, 09:12 AM
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vencops vencops is offline
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Would love to see a photo of the lawn (and not just the individual plant).

Good luck.
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  #4  
Old 07-17-2011, 02:22 PM
lakesregionscapes lakesregionscapes is offline
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Just got out there with the camera this morning (took grass blades home with me the other day).
Yes the lawn is going dormant because of the 90 degrees weather anyway... the green was much greener two days ago. This section is older, established grass, the development this yard is in is largely sandy, rocky soil (pines, oaks and beech trees) with minimal loam over the top - we didn't do anything to this section, but it is usually reliably green in slightly cooler weather. No watering, just mother nature, which has been stingy lately. The tire track is still pretty visible. This lawn was quite decent looking last month.
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  #5  
Old 07-17-2011, 02:25 PM
lakesregionscapes lakesregionscapes is offline
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and a closeup right along one of the tread lines.
I feel bad because these retired folks have had a pathetic excuse for a lawn for years, finally found money to redo the front, which came out fairly nice, and now it is looking about as bad as before.

second photo will NOT upload - have to try again later....

Last edited by lakesregionscapes; 07-17-2011 at 02:29 PM. Reason: photo upload failed
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  #6  
Old 07-17-2011, 03:16 PM
lakesregionscapes lakesregionscapes is offline
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closeup of tread line
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  #7  
Old 07-17-2011, 03:37 PM
topsites topsites is offline
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Looks like either regular heat stress, fertilizer or a chemical (such as Quinclorac) burn.

It's hard to say exactly, down at the bottom the near part looks like just regular heat stress but up top
on the far end of the hill, that looks like chemical burn, either way it's one or the other or both.

A. Someone needs to lay off the mower, take it easy on the nitro and the owner needs to start watering.
- If this is a naturally irrigated lawn, someone shouldn't be mowing near this much in the heat.
> Instead, cut high and let it go as long as possible.
B. Someone needs to lay off the pesticides.
C. All of the above.

At this point I would just take it easy, there's little anyone can do in the heat that may not make matters worse,
either that or it's just going to cost a ton of money so best recommendation is just get through summer best you can,
then in the fall aerate and reseed.

Last edited by topsites; 07-17-2011 at 03:45 PM.
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  #8  
Old 07-17-2011, 05:19 PM
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Merkava_4 Merkava_4 is offline
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In my experience with fescue that's been attacked by fungus, no matter how
much you water it, it still looks like it hasn't been watered in weeks. It's also
been my experience that certain brands of fescue seed are more susceptible
to getting disease than others. I will never buy the 50 pound bag of K31 fescue
from the tractor supply store ever again.
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  #9  
Old 07-17-2011, 06:11 PM
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jvanvliet jvanvliet is offline
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Looks dry to me... dehydration would cause the tire tracks to remain in the grass;

If those aren't tire marks someone doesn't know how to use a spreader.

Fungus needs moisture heat and humidity.

I'm with topsites on this one.
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  #10  
Old 07-17-2011, 06:18 PM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by topsites View Post
Looks like either regular heat stress, fertilizer or a chemical (such as Quinclorac) burn.

It's hard to say exactly, down at the bottom the near part looks like just regular heat stress but up top
on the far end of the hill, that looks like chemical burn, either way it's one or the other or both.

A. Someone needs to lay off the mower, take it easy on the nitro and the owner needs to start watering.
- If this is a naturally irrigated lawn, someone shouldn't be mowing near this much in the heat.
> Instead, cut high and let it go as long as possible.
B. Someone needs to lay off the pesticides.
C. All of the above.

At this point I would just take it easy, there's little anyone can do in the heat that may not make matters worse,
either that or it's just going to cost a ton of money so best recommendation is just get through summer best you can,
then in the fall aerate and reseed.
Agreed,

When does running a lawn tractor over dried up grass seem like a good idea???
When does applying NPK/'cides over dried up grass seem like a good idea???

Seems like every drought or excessive heat period there is more and more "Fungus Issues" than the previous drought season... As I drive around I see 'fungus issues' on almost every lawn... but it looks so nice after being freshly mowed...
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