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Old 09-20-2013, 02:10 PM
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BlazersandWildcats2009 BlazersandWildcats2009 is offline
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Composting Lawn

What's the schedule for guys in the south composting lawns? Thinking along the lines of three times a year Spring, Summer, and Fall. Any suggestions on a schedule? How deep are you currently composting across the lawn?
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Old 09-20-2013, 09:07 PM
agrostis agrostis is offline
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You have the right idea on timing, but compost is abrasive and zoysia can be tender so go in the middle of April, the first week of June and then the last week of July when the grass is actively growing, don't put compost down any later than this so you don't interfere with the grass going into dormancy. Put down 1/4 -1/2" at a time but don't create layer's in the soil profile, that's bad. Watering the compost in can be very effective. Watch out for weed seed's in the compost itself and be very picky when it come's to the source of the compost, know where it came from and what's in it.
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Old 09-21-2013, 12:36 PM
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BlazersandWildcats2009 BlazersandWildcats2009 is offline
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Agrostics,

I appreciate that word of advice. You teach me something new every time you respond to my post. I think I'm grasping the concept of everything slowly, but surely from all of your valuable information. I was lucky enough to get caught up at school so I spent a few hours drawing up a schedule yesterday. So rather than composting three times a year I should stick to twice, once in the late spring and another in the middle of summer. I found a local resource that also sells "Austin Soil Amendment" by the yard, I'm going to do some more research into this amendment oppose to using compost and what their "amendment for Austin" contains after my new soil test come back. I got them sent a week ago, so I should know something on that soon. I planned to spread (2) cubic yards over 1,000 sq. feet each time. Which equates to a little over a third of an inch each laying of the compost. Which comes out to be exactly between the 1/4" and 1/2" you posted, so maybe my research and your information is defiantly paying off.

As for the white spots that were showing up, they completely disappeared. However, we just had a whole day of SOLID raining, which the weather channel equated to "4.5", which was much needed. However, after the rain I had a few mushrooms pop up. Could this be a sign that I need to treat for fungicide?

Also, as for the lawn, the lawn looks extremely healthy, lush, and thick. All the edges of the sod greened up. After we finished laying the front lawn, I had some left over sod, that had dried out and looked like it was browning and dead, we through it around the back patio area after two days of drying out on the pallets. Believe it or not, it came to life, is fully green, and rooted around the back part also.

The main issue I'm experiencing is with wheat looking weeds are coming across the lawn. I don't know if it was in the soil that the sod was delivered in, if they came top dressing of compost I used before laying the sod, or if it was from the 3" tilling that brought the seeds up.

But from my understanding and everything I learned from you, I haven't touched with any kind of herbicide. I'm going to wait to Spring for that. I think when I get to cutting on a weekly basis the lawn will choke them out. I'm about to go on week four, I took several blades of the grass out and measured. The grass is up 4.0-4.2 inches across the lawn.

I put a brand new blade on the mower and within the next 2 weeks I should be ready to get started with the mowing, correct? I know you said I want to get it down to about 1.5 inches. Being at the height it is sitting, I plan to take about 3/4" off every three-four days until I get it down to proper height.

I'll let you know as soon as the soil analysis comes back that way you might can give me a little bit more information!

Thanks again for all of your time you put into helping me with this! I hope everything is going good with you out your way!

PS: All of that rain yesterday, to Sun shine and temps in the 80's today, perhaps perfect growing weather?
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Old 09-21-2013, 01:02 PM
agrostis agrostis is offline
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You don't need any fungicide, a few mushroom's is normal.

It's time for you to get a rain gauge. You can't go by the weatherman's total, it might be totally different than what you actually got. I like the tru-check, it's cheap and accurate, but you need a wide open space for one and you can't let them freeze with even a little water in them, they will crack.

https://www.google.com/search?q=tru-...I7GPCK_enUS320

Last edited by agrostis; 09-21-2013 at 01:07 PM.
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Old 09-21-2013, 01:03 PM
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BlazersandWildcats2009 BlazersandWildcats2009 is offline
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Agrostics,

I also have another question for you relating to feeding the lawn. From my understanding, you suggest Ammonia Sulfate if the soils read as Alkaline. I also understand Ammonia Sulfate contains a 21-0-0 formula of 21% nitrogen. If I chose to go this route in the spring time before the growing season, would you suggest mixing a formula of half a. sulfate / half fertilizer? Should I be okay without burning the lawn in the Spring if I applied a mix of fertilizer and a sulfate totaling to 1 lb. of nitrogen - 1,000 sq feet? I was thinking something along the lines of 3 lbs. of a. sulfate / 2 lbs of 15-5-10? I would think this would help soil conditions, the needed nitrogen portion, and also have an active formula before the growing season? I just want to be sure not to do any burning, but as you said I think the a. sulfate might benefit us in our area. From studies and test at A&M I've read that after testing with ammonia sulfate, they ran into an issue of the coating not holding on the a. sulfate under extreme hot conditions. So I was thinking this might be best applied as my Spring Fertilizer? Don't be afraid to tell me if I'm completely wrong, but being that a. sulfate is 21-0-0, I would think applying a smaller rate of 15-5-10 and the a. sulfate combined would also provided the needed formulation for growing before the active growing season?
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Old 09-21-2013, 01:05 PM
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BlazersandWildcats2009 BlazersandWildcats2009 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by agrostis View Post
It's time for you to get a rain gauge. You can't go by the weatherman's total, it might be totally different than what you actually got. I like the tru-check, it's cheap and accurate, but you need a wide open space for one and you can't let them freeze with even a little water in them, they will crack.

https://www.google.com/search?q=tru-...I7GPCK_enUS320

Speaking of a rain gauge, I just walked right by one earlier at the nursery right next to our house and had thoughts when I walked by. I'll be on my way to pick it up today.
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Old 09-21-2013, 01:06 PM
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BlazersandWildcats2009 BlazersandWildcats2009 is offline
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Speaking of the test on the a. sulfate here's the link from the information I was referring to.

http://www.dirtdoctor.com/organic/ga...search/id/101/
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Old 09-21-2013, 01:57 PM
agrostis agrostis is offline
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Alkaline soil's are not my specialty, there are people here that can give you much better advice. In NC the soil's are mostly acid, i have never had to deal with your particular situation.
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Old 09-21-2013, 02:58 PM
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BlazersandWildcats2009 BlazersandWildcats2009 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by agrostis View Post
Alkaline soil's are not my specialty, there are people here that can give you much better advice. In NC the soil's are mostly acid, i have never had to deal with your particular situation.
Defiantly understandable. it seems everywhere I read our area is covered with this problem. Although your not experienced with our soils, I defiantly do appreciate all the general information you've gave to us regarding the preparation, planting, and maintenance information you've given to us. I've called radio stations, talked to master gardeners, talked to experts at A&M, and obviously received a ton of great information from you. I'll try and find someone that specialized with our soil and fert programs after the soil test comes back. But I would like to tell you we appreciate all the knowledge you've spread to us. We have the only sodded lawn in our neighborhood, so it's obviously the best looking. I'm hoping in the next year or two our yard will be better looking than the yards in the next neighborhood over, (which is a more expensive housing community.)

There's another on the block that I guess decided to try and follow my steps after we decided to sod. Now I have no clue what their doing, but I've been watching their lawn over weeks. They went from a rented tiller, to seeding, to sodding half the front lawn and letting it dry out, to installing an irrigation system. Every day there's someone new working on their lawn getting done minimum work and it appears as if their taking advantage of the old man living there. But it's interesting to watch the progress of the surrounding lawns. I know for a fact we wouldn't be where we are today without the information you've given to us, so we appreciate you greatly!

Here's some info on our soils. It appears as if the Alkaline soil is a pretty big thing around here, even the vegetable gardeners are having to work around it. If I'm not mistaken I had read in an article that our Zoysia adapts to growing in many different types of soils. What's your input on that?

http://gardeninglaunchpad.com/article/austinsoil.html

http://testmygarden.com/austin-tx-so...1322066470.pdf

http://www.realgreenlawns.com/austin...ofertilize.htm


http://www.texasalmanac.com/topics/e...nt/soils-texas


http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/l...161202743.html

http://www.wildflower.org/expert/show.php?id=7728
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Old 01-17-2014, 01:54 PM
Bubbatex0 Bubbatex0 is offline
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Fert

Go to Gaddys in Pfville and get the brown bag fert.

Robert
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