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  #21  
Old 10-06-2013, 06:17 PM
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Scag48 Scag48 is offline
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Seattle is finally investing in mass transit in the form of rail, we're only 60 years behind every other major city in this country. 2025 will see the completion of the system, I can't remember the dollar amount for the whole system but it's in the billions. It's just unfortunate Seattle waited this long to make this investment, however it's putting a bunch of hands to work. That job kept me going through some real slow times, it was definitely a good one for me.
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  #22  
Old 10-07-2013, 09:27 PM
Kepple Services Kepple Services is offline
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Seattle isn't the only city behind... Orlando and the surrounding areas are finally installing light rail, sunrail. Should be open and partially running sometime in early 2014 We have no real mass transit system here other than bus lines and cabs. Its sad that there are metro areas in the country that still have no established mass transit and rely heavily on private transportation. This is one way European countries are ahead of us. They believe and use heavily mass transit. In many ways I admire the way they do many things there.
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  #23  
Old 10-16-2013, 11:07 PM
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Scag48 Scag48 is offline
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Few more photos guys. First picture is a luffing tower crane I spent a couple days working under as a bellman. Second picture is up in the cab while flat sticked so the operator could grease the sheaves. It was earlier this summer, 95 degrees and the operator is such a cool guy he let me enjoy the A/C for a bit while he greased. Booming that thing up from flat stick is an experience unlike anything else I think I've ever done, you look up and that stick just keeps going. 220 feet of stick in that bad boy, tower height I want to say is around 100-125 feet. Very unique, luffers are around but they're pretty uncommon. This crane is capable of booming up to about 13 feet of the tower, boom sticks more or less straight up. I felt as if it was going to go over backwards, absolutely unreal.

I very much want a seat in a traditional hammerhead tower crane at some point, my big push is to get my tower certification in the next 12 months. The luffer is an entirely different animal that I'm not sure I want to jump on quite yet. I asked the operator how he does it, given he's run crane for 40 years he told me "Well, you have to be a little nuts and keep yourself right with the Lord." No joke there. While booming that crane up from flat stick, I bobbled between points (speeds) in the boom drum, tower starts rocking back and forth, swallowed up some seat with that goof up.
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  #24  
Old 10-16-2013, 11:21 PM
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AEL AEL is offline
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Very impressive work. Won't see me up that high !
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  #25  
Old 11-13-2013, 11:46 PM
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Scag48 Scag48 is offline
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Here's a few from the last job we did. Spent a month with this 70 ton Grove RT flying framing and roofing material. Pretty good gig here.
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  #26  
Old 11-14-2013, 06:43 PM
w900snowman w900snowman is offline
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Very cool pictures, I always thought that rigging and just large cranes in general would be an interesting career. One question. On your last tower crane pic in the cab, what are the numbers written on the lower right of the windshield for?
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  #27  
Old 11-14-2013, 09:41 PM
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Scag48 Scag48 is offline
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The numbers are radius reference numbers to concrete support columns and they are marked on the glass in the same way they are laid out on the job. It makes a big difference when you're flying mud with a bucket, every floor the columns are in the same place so you can just look down to the number and highball the boom until you reach the radius you need. Even if you're not pouring mud, radius reference points are still quite useful. If I'm on the ground, I can tell the operator to pin it to the wood on the boom to a particular column and he'll run wide open until he gets close, then I'll bring him in the rest of the way. Those luffers, in comparison to traditional tower cranes, are real slow to boom down much like any traditional crane. The beauty of hammerhead towers with a trolley is that you can cover a whole lot of radius in a hurry. Sometimes when you're running with quite a bit of line in the air, you could be leading the load with the trolley by as much as 6-8 feet, it's just moving that fast.

That particular job won't see too many poured floors, it was 3 stories of parking garage or something like that, but on big high rise buildings the columns are always in the same place, you could potentially pour the same set of columns 20-30 times. However, high rise concrete pumps are getting so good that they'll push mud up 30-40 floors no problem and they have a placing boom, just like concrete reach pump trucks, that rides up the building as it goes along so most outfits aren't pouring with cranes anymore.

I've been on the hoisting side of things for about 3 years now. When I started out in the Operating Engineers as an apprentice, all I wanted to do is move dirt. I miss the dirt from time to time, but hoisting can be fun on busy jobs. Guy on the ground is practically running the crane while working in the blind, it's all about trust and knowing some tricks to getting in and out of tight spots. I make it a challenge to go as fast as I can and this outfit I'm working for has no slouch operators so it makes it really fun to push the limits.
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Last edited by Scag48; 11-14-2013 at 09:51 PM.
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  #28  
Old 11-15-2013, 06:30 AM
w900snowman w900snowman is offline
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That makes sense now, thanks for the explanation. I ran the 80T bridge crane at work from time to time and can't imagine what it would be like with that much line flying through the air.

Now you've got me more interested in the tower cranes. I might have to add one to my Manitowoc collection.
Great Pictures and details please keep them coming.
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  #29  
Old 11-15-2013, 01:45 PM
mxridernorth mxridernorth is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scag48 View Post
The numbers are radius reference numbers to concrete support columns and they are marked on the glass in the same way they are laid out on the job. It makes a big difference when you're flying mud with a bucket, every floor the columns are in the same place so you can just look down to the number and highball the boom until you reach the radius you need. Even if you're not pouring mud, radius reference points are still quite useful. If I'm on the ground, I can tell the operator to pin it to the wood on the boom to a particular column and he'll run wide open until he gets close, then I'll bring him in the rest of the way. Those luffers, in comparison to traditional tower cranes, are real slow to boom down much like any traditional crane. The beauty of hammerhead towers with a trolley is that you can cover a whole lot of radius in a hurry. Sometimes when you're running with quite a bit of line in the air, you could be leading the load with the trolley by as much as 6-8 feet, it's just moving that fast.

That particular job won't see too many poured floors, it was 3 stories of parking garage or something like that, but on big high rise buildings the columns are always in the same place, you could potentially pour the same set of columns 20-30 times. However, high rise concrete pumps are getting so good that they'll push mud up 30-40 floors no problem and they have a placing boom, just like concrete reach pump trucks, that rides up the building as it goes along so most outfits aren't pouring with cranes anymore.

I've been on the hoisting side of things for about 3 years now. When I started out in the Operating Engineers as an apprentice, all I wanted to do is move dirt. I miss the dirt from time to time, but hoisting can be fun on busy jobs. Guy on the ground is practically running the crane while working in the blind, it's all about trust and knowing some tricks to getting in and out of tight spots. I make it a challenge to go as fast as I can and this outfit I'm working for has no slouch operators so it makes it really fun to push the limits.
It's really awesome that you have found a career that you are obviously excited and passionate about. I look forward to seeing your career progress.
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  #30  
Old 11-15-2013, 05:12 PM
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Moose's Mowing Moose's Mowing is offline
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that video literally made me sick. Wonder how that guy gets his pants on with balls that big.
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