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Old 10-01-2013, 09:19 PM
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Above Par Lawns Above Par Lawns is offline
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Acidic soil, lime & peat moss

My clients soil test results came back at 5.3 and she is wanting to seed her lawn. I will be applying lime now, and then again in the Spring as directed by MU extension office. There are portions of the lawn with a good stand of grass but other areas are dirt/hard pan. The bare areas would normally get top dressed with peat after the renovation process but since I'm trying to fix the acidity problem should I choose a different topdress material since peat is acidic itself?

The largest dirt patch is bone dry and in full sun, the other is in heavy shade and soggy! multiple seed varieties will be used.
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Old 10-01-2013, 09:30 PM
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Above Par Lawns Above Par Lawns is offline
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Probably should not have posted this in the organic section. Sorry.
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Old 10-01-2013, 09:41 PM
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phasthound phasthound is offline
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Make sure you use Calcitic lime instead of Dolomitic lime. The second contains Mg, which you don't need. I would recommend applying compost instead of peat for better results.
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Old 10-01-2013, 10:28 PM
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Above Par Lawns Above Par Lawns is offline
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Yes, calcitic lime is on the list! I will have to search for a better supplier of compost. I have used it before in small areas and although I still had good results, the quality of the compost was poor. It was much cheaper than peat that's for sure. I just like the way peat seems to lock itself in place and hold moisture. Will I get the same affect with compost? I could add some straw if needed on the areas with slope I suppose.
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Old 10-06-2013, 09:24 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phasthound View Post
Make sure you use Calcitic lime instead of Dolomitic lime. The second contains Mg, which you don't need. I would recommend applying compost instead of peat for better results.
......... Seconded
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Old 10-06-2013, 07:52 PM
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dKoester dKoester is offline
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Grow some blueberries! They will do great with that PH.
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