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  #61  
Old 11-30-2013, 10:57 PM
PremierSwrx PremierSwrx is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AEL View Post
Company in North Carolina I believe produces it . I don't know in your area where to purchase, I can give you my Canadian Sales mans information if you need it. It comes in those large bags/totes that you lift with an excavator . For that size of a job your probably need. Tractor Trailer Load. I believe the manufacturers name is zappa tech .
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PM me his info if you would thanks
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  #62  
Old 12-01-2013, 07:49 AM
whiffyspark whiffyspark is online now
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What about doubling up mud mats?
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  #63  
Old 12-01-2013, 08:38 AM
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Construct'O Construct'O is offline
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Not knowing all the details is hard to give info,but here we usually start at the edge of the pond and dig down cleaning off a spot to set the machine on solid footing.Here under the silt there is a solid bottom.Might different on you job.

If you can get to solid ground.Then build ramp down into the hole for the truck and start loading out the silt.You have to get a starting area to get anything done.As you get things going you can dig a path through the silt keep things cleaned off as you go then maybe get your dozer going and pushing material out to you to load in your truck to haul it to the waste area.

If you look a Chris thread you can get some good ideas.As far as the mat thing the 330 is to heavy even with the mats.Chris is using a 200 size machine you might have to rent a smaller excavator to be abe to use your mats to any good.Then move material back to the 330 .Keep it on soldi ground or your job from Hell !!! Will get worst.

You got to keep things cleaned up and on solid footing.Good luck
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  #64  
Old 12-01-2013, 12:32 PM
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Yea I was going to suggest a smaller machine with wide pads. I guess high desert rock isn't so bad!
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  #65  
Old 12-01-2013, 12:57 PM
PremierSwrx PremierSwrx is offline
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We have a Cat 320 which we thought about using, but the issue still stands that even with mats under our 305.5 that thing would start sinking after about 10 mins. on the soil, our engineer likened it to the ice road truckers that as the machine moves across the soil a water pocket bubbles in front till a point at which it breaks the surface then its all over and that's exactly what's happening
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  #66  
Old 12-01-2013, 02:14 PM
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KrayzKajun KrayzKajun is online now
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Looks like you need a set of pontoons. Local company here makes them for all size excavators.




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  #67  
Old 12-01-2013, 04:18 PM
PremierSwrx PremierSwrx is offline
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I need to learn to say no to projects like these, is what I need haha
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  #68  
Old 12-01-2013, 04:24 PM
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KrayzKajun KrayzKajun is online now
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I need to learn to say no to projects like these, is what I need haha
It's easier said than done.
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  #69  
Old 12-01-2013, 08:13 PM
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AEL AEL is offline
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Sorry to say but your engineer is crazy and shame on him for not knowing better. Pond mud/sediment or silt can be some of the hardest material to deal with. I have picked up many a job that other companies priced thinking it is easy to deal with and after a few days walk away from the job and I get the call to clean up .

Problem is that even if you start at the beginning and try to cut a path through the material it will just keep falling down into the area that you removed the material from. If the material is really deep ( which it looks like it is) it can take months of dry weather to dry it out enough to walk a machine ( even with Mats ) on top of . How deep is the water on top of the areas you have to dredge? You might be better letting the pond/lake full up and placing a long reach on a barge. With material that deep and saturated I don't even think a flocculant will dry it out.
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  #70  
Old 12-01-2013, 08:21 PM
PremierSwrx PremierSwrx is offline
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Originally Posted by AEL View Post
Sorry to say but your engineer is crazy and shame on him for not knowing better. Pond mud/sediment or silt can be some of the hardest material to deal with. I have picked up many a job that other companies priced thinking it is easy to deal with and after a few days walk away from the job and I get the call to clean up .

Problem is that even if you start at the beginning and try to cut a path through the material it will just keep falling down into the area that you removed the material from. If the material is really deep ( which it looks like it is) it can take months of dry weather to dry it out enough to walk a machine ( even with Mats ) on top of . How deep is the water on top of the areas you have to dredge? You might be better letting the pond/lake full up and placing a long reach on a barge. With material that deep and saturated I don't even think a flocculant will dry it out.
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The engineer used to work for us, as of Friday he is seeking other employment, said he made a mistake on his math!
There is no standing water in any of the areas that need to be dredged out. I feel even if we used our 320 with mats it would still sink, I like the long reach and barge idea. I would think even if we just put the 320 on a barge throw that out there it may work well, question is where to you rent a barge? I agree I don't think the flocculent will do much there is just to much with all the water that's there. I have explained time and time again to the homeowner involved that there is just to much water in the ground this time of year and we would have to wait until we have 115 degree Texas heat to dry it up. But people with money think they know so much and want it done now and just don't want to wait its sad.
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