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Old 03-10-2015, 09:10 PM
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meets1 meets1 is offline
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How important is oil?

Every piece of diesel equipment i have is new within the last 4 years. BC, wacker, NH and ditch witch equipment. Everyone has there own oil filters. Everyone says your to use there oil or void warrenty if engine fails. I haven't alwasy gone with the name brand filters, I have usually went to WIX filters but now with new machine and talking to their shop guys that is a no no in there world. I kinda hate it bc my thinking is quality diesel oil should be fine no matter the "brand name" on bottle. I usually buy oil in bulk but this new equipment thing and there brand oil is killing me here. What do you guys do?
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Old 03-10-2015, 09:57 PM
tcm5483 tcm5483 is offline
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As long as the oil you use meets the oem spec they have to warranty any claim. All oil filters are not created equal you have different micron ratings and they all do not fit like the oem filter the same always use the oem filter or find out who is the real manufacturer of the oem filter is it could be wix In your case .air filters are the same way. if you take a filter that is not the name brand of the manufacturer and you buy one from the local parts store it mite look the same but will not do as good a job as oem. filtration is the life of the engine .patent also play a lot in this . oil is oil just with detergent oil additives to keep them free of sludge and general engine gunk.Synthetic oil Is alittle different story.
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Old 03-11-2015, 05:13 PM
nomorelawns nomorelawns is offline
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Originally Posted by meets1 View Post
Every piece of diesel equipment i have is new within the last 4 years. BC, wacker, NH and ditch witch equipment. Everyone has there own oil filters. Everyone says your to use there oil or void warrenty if engine fails. I haven't alwasy gone with the name brand filters, I have usually went to WIX filters but now with new machine and talking to their shop guys that is a no no in there world. I kinda hate it bc my thinking is quality diesel oil should be fine no matter the "brand name" on bottle. I usually buy oil in bulk but this new equipment thing and there brand oil is killing me here. What do you guys do?
I used to go the same route: WIX equivalent and whatever oil met manufacturers specs.

I think with the changes in diesel engines and to a certain degree the hydraulics on heavy equipment, it has become the time to use OEM filters whenever feasible.

With respect to oil, my only input would be to see if your dealer of whatever equipment will sell you small "totes" of oil that they would use in their shop. I think they are a couple hundred gallons? If you can use if for multiple purposes i.e. use the same specialty engine oil in multiple pieces of equipment and possibly some of your trucks, that may be cost effective to use said specialty oil. Maybe same with hydraulic oil, if the manufacturers specs are similar enough, more than one piece may be able to share a single manufacturers branded oil bought in bulk thru your dealer.
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Old 03-11-2015, 06:05 PM
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meets1 meets1 is offline
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I agree with oils. I spoke with the newest equipment reps that I have and they said high quality oil is, to the most part the same. But 50 hours or 2000 hours they told me best to stick with oem filters. Design, microns, etc all play a part with the oil and engine. WIX crosses a few but not all. In regards to totes, that is what I normally have. I think mine come in 250 gallon square like containers. That much oil is reasonable for me.
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Old 03-11-2015, 06:50 PM
nomorelawns nomorelawns is offline
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I have heard of some instances where the engine oil filters had the same filtration as OEM, but lacked check valve or some other design element that could have adverse effects on engine longevity. Shibaura tractor engines on current LS/New Holland T4 tractors was one, and I'm sure there are many more.
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Old 03-11-2015, 08:00 PM
swanny swanny is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nomorelawns View Post
I have heard of some instances where the engine oil filters had the same filtration as OEM, but lacked check valve or some other design element that could have adverse effects on engine longevity. Shibaura tractor engines on current LS/New Holland T4 tractors was one, and I'm sure there are many more.
Have heard of can rupturing on the aftermarket oil filters when it's very cold out, haven't experienced it though.
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Old 03-11-2015, 10:30 PM
nomorelawns nomorelawns is offline
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Wow that's pretty bad. Could happen without over pressure relief working correctly.

I actually had that happen on an old Dodge truck when I was a teenager. Didn't rupture the filter, but would blow the thick rubber seal right out the side and spray oil everywhere. Probably the worst slug of a truck ever made. Dodge Dakota with a carbureted 2.2 4 cylinder.
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Old 03-15-2015, 12:33 AM
Durallymax Durallymax is offline
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Originally Posted by nomorelawns View Post

With respect to oil, my only input would be to see if your dealer of whatever equipment will sell you small "totes" of oil that they would use in their shop. I think they are a couple hundred gallons? If you can use if for multiple purposes i.e. use the same specialty engine oil in multiple pieces of equipment and possibly some of your trucks, that may be cost effective to use said specialty oil. Maybe same with hydraulic oil, if the manufacturers specs are similar enough, more than one piece may be able to share a single manufacturers branded oil bought in bulk thru your dealer.
This is actually not a good idea if the dealer is selling the OEM labeled oil. The OEM oil is fine to run in the OEM machine, but generally lacks API certification so using it in anything else can get you into trouble on warranty if the other OEM wants to squawk about it.

Just simply use a good oil that meets the specs required by the engine. Technically the OEM cannot require you to use their lubricants or filters unless they supply them for free (some do actually do this, our Fendt tractors get all service done "free" by dealer for warranty period 3k/3yr). Engine oils are pretty simply but some of the additives they want for the hydraulics can make it a PITA at times. If you don't want the hassle and you just have a few small machines, you can just buy their pails of fluid and probably be set for awhile. Otherwise find a good oil supplier that knows their stuff, and tell them what you have and what you want to do. The OEM is much less likely to try and get out of something if you are using a quality name brand oil. I use Delo for all of our stuff, they actually do have a guarantee that if their oil is proven to be at fault they will reimburse you for repairs. I've never known anyone thats used it, but out of the top brands its the best free warranty/guarantee. Other companies do offer similar programs but charge for them, or have bigger restrictions. 15w40 Delo 400LE is less than $11/gallon in bulk. 10W30 400XLE is a bit more. If you dont want to buy in bulk, Chevron is advertising it for just over $11 at walmart. Most of the smaller diesels are running 10w30 now, actually the 10w30 Delo is factory fill for PACCAR semis (Pete/KW) now. Better fuel mileage. Powerstrokes run 10w30 also.

Oil is not just oil, but across the top brands with the same specs you might as well flip a coin. No synthetic is not necessarily better either. It is very important to get a CJ4 oil if that is what the machine calls for especially if it has a DPF. You need the low SAPS to keep the DPF clean.


It's nicest to just have one or two kinds of bulk oils at the most and if needed a couple jugs for the things that have special requirements, usually cars more than anything.

As far as the filters go, if your equipment is less than 4 years old it all more than likely is rated for long drain intervals from the factory. Most equipment can go fairly long on drains, but under warranty it wouldn't be worth it. New machines from various companies are now around 500hr OCI's for the engine. The cost of an oil filter for them from the OEM is probably not that bad. None of the Cat filters are over $20 each and I am always told that yellow paint is supposed to be expensive (yet its always the cheapest it seems). The Napa Gold/Wix/Carquest only saves a couple dollars and the quality difference is noticeable. Fuel filters for a newer common rail motor are something I would not skimp on. The added costs of just using the OEM filters for the warranty period isn't much and avoids any possible headaches should something fail. The law says they can't deny warranty due to another filter, but if that filter actually did fail then they can, even if it didn't you will have to get involved with a lawyer if they want to deny it and we all know how well that goes.

Our Cat's have 3yr/3k warranty, changed at the factory intervals. The savings are minimal for the most part. (See Attachment)
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  #9  
Old 03-15-2015, 09:32 AM
nomorelawns nomorelawns is offline
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"This is actually not a good idea if the dealer is selling the OEM labeled oil. The OEM oil is fine to run in the OEM machine, but generally lacks API certification so using it in anything else can get you into trouble on warranty if the other OEM wants to squawk about it."

Not sure about any other companies oil, but the dealer I worked for (Kubota) used OEM lubricants which had API cert along with a list of other companies standards that the lubricant met or exceeded.
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Old 03-15-2015, 02:37 PM
Durallymax Durallymax is offline
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Kubota is listed as having multiple products that are API certified. Not all OEM's do this though, they really don't need to. Why pay to go through the certification when you know it will work fine in your own products.

Meeting API specs is different than being certified also, crafty wording by some at times.

It shouldn't be an issue but is a very distant rare "what if". Usually not getting a smoking deal on OEM oils so buying them for all of your stuff isn't always the most affordable, but some people do and some get good deals also.
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