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  #1  
Old 11-24-2013, 04:04 PM
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inzane inzane is online now
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Tree and Shrub treatment

i'm gonna try to add tree and shrub treatment next year. wondering how important it is to have deep root feeding in a program? I have an extra skid but not sure what exactly i would need to be able to do a deep root feeding. how many GPM should i need to be putting out to properly do a deep root with some sort of injection gun? Also, i'm seeing some companies around here doing as much as 8 apps on shrubs, and some doing as few as 5 apps. I'm still trying to determine what i should do. Is it best to have a preventative program, or check shrubs with each lawn treatment and treat as needed?

I've lost plenty of potential new customers this year, because i don't offer this service..
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Old 11-24-2013, 08:32 PM
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ted putnam ted putnam is offline
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We do 5+ apps depending on the landscape.
Standard-2 Ferts. 1 Spring and 1 Fall
3 I & D's in between
Extra/Optional- Post Bloom Fertilization for azaleas, Dormant Oil Application in the Fall.
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Old 11-25-2013, 01:58 AM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
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Deep root feeding is somewhat of a misnomer. Most of the absorbing roots are in the first 8" of soil. I use a small gauge needle made of stainless tubing that puts products at that depth. My main reason for injecting is to get materials past the sod or ground cover. Lots of people mix imidacloprid in a pail and pour it or throw granular fertilizers around trees. Punching a needle down 12-18" just makes it more likely an irrigation pipe will get hit. My Hypro D30 is plenty enough to feed. I agree with a previous thread in that trees and shrubs do not benefit from being shot up with high rates of straight nitrogen. My liquid mix is a lot more balanced and does not apply more than 1/4 lb of N per 1000 sq ft at a time. As for how often to service/monitor, I think shrubs should be at least looked at every 14 days, a lot can happen in 30-60 days. Expensive? Not as expensive as having an issue develop, then run away from you. There is always money and time to fix cheap and half jobs, never enough time or money to do it right the first time. How long is your growing season and do you have a fix on typical issues that come up during that season. What I do is totally non applicable due to a 365 frost free days, but the possibility of plants going through semi dormancy due to lack of sun and colder than normal temperatures. Plants are like the natives, a 70 degree week is considered cold.
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Old 11-28-2013, 12:12 PM
Mike's Lawn Care Mike's Lawn Care is offline
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What are 3 I & Ds ???
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Old 11-28-2013, 01:49 PM
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ted putnam ted putnam is offline
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Sorry, I &D stands for "Insect & Disease Control". Remember to rotate your insecticides/fungicides every application. I try to use Merit as my insecticide on the first I & D so the plants are more inclined to absorb it into there system while putting on new growth. Before I had a dedicated sprayer I spread Merit .5G in ornamental beds with excellent season long control. The sprayer makes things easier for larger landscapes so I mix Merit in the Tank now for the most part.
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Old 11-28-2013, 06:10 PM
Mike's Lawn Care Mike's Lawn Care is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ted putnam View Post
Sorry, I &D stands for "Insect & Disease Control". Remember to rotate your insecticides/fungicides every application. I try to use Merit as my insecticide on the first I & D so the plants are more inclined to absorb it into there system while putting on new growth. Before I had a dedicated sprayer I spread Merit .5G in ornamental beds with excellent season long control. The sprayer makes things easier for larger landscapes so I mix Merit in the Tank now for the most part.
Thanks, I should probably have new that. Just got my license in 2012 so trying to get ready this year and doing my research.
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Old 12-02-2013, 08:06 PM
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inzane inzane is online now
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thanks for the info. i'm probably looking at adding 5 rounds for tree and shrub next year. the spring/fall fert + 3 I&d's in the summer may work.. still researching. alot of companies do dormant oil in the winter months.. adding more rounds. I figure i'd do that only if it was needed. I was gonna stick to granular fert only using one of those belly grinder spreaders. No deep roots for now.

dormant oil treatments make me a little nervous to apply. from reading the label anyways. thats about the only thing i haven't done. I've done deep roots before, and the I & d's.
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Old 12-02-2013, 08:15 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
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These days, what is most commonly sold is an all season oil that can be used when the plant is in leaf. PureSpray Green and UltraPure by BASF comes to mind. In the past, heavy, crude formulations that were not safe for use on non dormant plants were common. I am oiling plants just about all month of the year. My cut off is when it is over 90 in the day and not less than 80 at night. Thankfully. there is not too much of that for too long in my location.

In the landscape, the third way to apply fertilizers is to have a liquid formulation applied at 5-10 gallons per 1000. I keep the N at less than 1/2 lb. This is the one place where I will use a chemlawn gun. It is easy to apply high volumes of liquid and not blow off leaves at the pressures normally needed to run 10 gallons per 1000.
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