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  #11  
Old 11-27-2013, 01:08 PM
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easy-lift guy easy-lift guy is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tonygreek View Post
18 months or don't proceed any further? Was that a typo, easy-lift? Even your much beloved SCORE recommends the usual 6 months.
I recommend 18 months as a general rule. SCORE has nothing to do with that opinion.
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  #12  
Old 11-27-2013, 01:19 PM
metalsasquach metalsasquach is offline
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I will definatly not be quitting my day job anytime soon, so paying the bills ive already been paying will not be an issue. Especially since our rent will be paid 7 of the 12 months. I understand having money in the bank will make it easier and worry free but its basically out of the question. I have what i have, no risk no reward.

My current job is an early shift mon-fri i get out by 10am everyday, which will free up virtually anytime for mowing. So ill be working my normal hours at my "day job", but would have enough time left in the day to operate this buisiness full time; eventually when the work comes.
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  #13  
Old 11-27-2013, 01:25 PM
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tonygreek tonygreek is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by easy-lift guy View Post
I recommend 18 months as a general rule. SCORE has nothing to do with that opinion.
easy-lift guy
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While a cushion is great, and quite often goes unheeded, that's a very lofty bit of advice for people with an entrepreneurial mindset, especially to follow it up with "Don't proceed any further.". In all my years of advisory experience, usually as an angel investor and advisor, I can't think of one instance where anyone would follow it. Entrepreneurs tend to do what they need to do. Or want to do.

Btw, I'm not being argumentative, just find it interesting that your adamant advice here is counter to that of what you tend to lean on the most, with that being for people to contact SCORE.

Quote:
Originally Posted by metalsasquach View Post
I will definatly not be quitting my day job anytime soon, so paying the bills ive already been paying will not be an issue. Especially since our rent will be paid 7 of the 12 months. I understand having money in the bank will make it easier and worry free but its basically out of the question. I have what i have, no risk no reward.

My current job is an early shift mon-fri i get out by 10am everyday, which will free up virtually anytime for mowing. So ill be working my normal hours at my "day job", but would have enough time left in the day to operate this buisiness full time; eventually when the work comes.
Sounds like you've got a good strategy and outlook. Ride that other job and, presumably, benefits, as long as you can. Good luck!
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  #14  
Old 11-27-2013, 07:06 PM
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Originally Posted by TheLugNutZ View Post
I think he means 18 months IF the guy is going to be doing this full time and quitting his day job.

Im starting next spring (only part time) and if i were to save 18 months of expenses (my share, not including my wifes contribution to the household) I would need $50k in the bank, YIKES!
You are correct, yes 50,000.00 is a lot of money, however it really has to be marshaled, in case that new found profession takes a nose dive. I have seen many individuals start out in this industry at the beginning of the mowing season, usually April 1st, no fooling only to have their equipment usually homeowner grade worth less than 5 Cents on the Dollar by the end of the season, if that. Starting out without enough Capital in the first place is bad enough, having little or no reserves for 18 months is just adding insult to injury.
The OP would still like to continue his full time job and if that is possible along with starting this new business venture, I do wish him the best.
Burning the candle at both ends, and very possibly not having enough money saved to make the final transition from one full time job to another May well be a completely different story. I still believe when and if the OP contacts SCORE
the councilors will be able to give him advise after he provides his business plan for their review,consideration. If available I would recommending the mentoring program if available.
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  #15  
Old 11-27-2013, 07:34 PM
metalsasquach metalsasquach is offline
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Can anybody touch on my overhead estimate? I decided not to get as loan and pay for the handhelds upfront, so the loan payment can now be taken out of my estimated overhead.

I figured $800 a month for fuel, which will obviously depend on how much work I have.

Also any recommendations on hand held equipment? I have a few local Stihl dealers, but don't need to buy the top of the line stuff ($500 blowers) etc.

Thanks again for all the replies.
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  #16  
Old 11-27-2013, 08:12 PM
larryinalabama larryinalabama is online now
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Take it all slow.

Id buy Troy built or Ryobi attachment plus to start and move into commercial stuff as soon as possible, the box store stuff will make a real good "back up".

This time of year its likely you can find a real good used commercial mower, may have to travel a little to get what you want but it will be worth it.

Don't spent a fortuniue on advertising, using flyers in the area you want to target is labor intensive but not that expensive.

I wouldn't borrow any money even if you have to work part time and invest what you make into the business.

I spent 1 year purchasing equiptment, then worked part time for 18 months starting.

With the exception of borrowing money you have a good plan and if lawncare is your passion you will do alright.

Expenses vary widely, generally mine run close to 33%.
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  #17  
Old 11-27-2013, 08:54 PM
echo echo is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by metalsasquach View Post
Can anybody touch on my overhead estimate? I decided not to get as loan and pay for the handhelds upfront, so the loan payment can now be taken out of my estimated overhead.

I figured $800 a month for fuel, which will obviously depend on how much work I have.


Also any recommendations on hand held equipment? I have a few local Stihl dealers, but don't need to buy the top of the line stuff ($500 blowers) etc.

Thanks again for all the replies.
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Spend the money once on commercial equipment. A husqvarna 223l trimmer is almost bulletproof and can be had for $250.

A $500 backpack blower will set you up for mow and blow, AND for spring/fall/leaf cleanups, will save you a ton of time, make you money faster, and will last you a long time.

Other equipment can be picked up as you make money. A commercial grade multi-tool with quality attachments will save you a small fortune over designated tools, will save space as you can put all of them easily in the back of the SUV and use them as you need them.

Work hard, do a good job and the work will come quickly. When it does, the homeowner crap isn't gonna hold up and you'll be spending the money again.

Put a nice, professional ad on Craigslist, with PICTURES. Update it in the morning and late afternoon. Put your website and Facebook link on the ad. Weed out the jobs that nobody wants and the cheapskates, and you'll have as much work as you can handle with FREE advertising.

Good luck!
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  #18  
Old 11-27-2013, 08:58 PM
metalsasquach metalsasquach is offline
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Thank you, everyone is very encouraging.
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  #19  
Old 11-27-2013, 09:31 PM
32vld 32vld is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by echo View Post
A $500 backpack blower will set you up for mow and blow, AND for spring/fall/leaf cleanups, will save you a ton of time, make you money faster, and will last you a long time.

When I started out I used/borrowed my friends old sears hand held. It could barely blow out a birth cake candle.

Then I was given a used Echo handheld. Worked great for handling grass clippings.

When I got my first BR 600 I never new how good a BP blower good be. I thought that I was going to keep using the Echo HH for mowing to lighten the use on the BR 600.

Thing is I found that the BR 600 got rid of the grass clippings so much faster that I stopped taking the Echo HH when I mowed lawns.
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  #20  
Old 11-27-2013, 09:44 PM
echo echo is online now
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Try the Husqvarna 580/Redmax 8500 and you'll have the same thoughts with the 600 as you had with the Echo.

I didn't listen and started with a small backpack, myself. After about 5 leaf jobs I couldn't get rid of it fast enough.
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