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Old 04-09-2015, 10:59 PM
daniel watson daniel watson is offline
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College or Work

I'm trying to figure out what to do I am studying turf grass management in college right now however I have 23yards I mow and work with another guy. I feel like I can expand my business really well in 2 years. Should I finish my degree that I am one year in to or grow my lawncare business. This isn't just a job to me it's a passion I love it.
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Old 04-09-2015, 11:12 PM
RSMUTAH RSMUTAH is offline
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Would a degree in turf grass management be beneficial to your turf grass management company?
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Old 04-09-2015, 11:16 PM
daniel watson daniel watson is offline
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Would a degree in turf grass management be beneficial to your turf grass management company?
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I think it would help me get some commercial accounts other than that no.
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Old 04-10-2015, 02:16 AM
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TPendagast TPendagast is offline
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I think it would help me get some commercial accounts other than that no.
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No, it's not going to help you get any commercial accounts, not unless you are privy to leads for golf course management (yes private companies do multiple courses, its not always an in-house super) athletic fields, resort chains or the like.

There's a reason why the second year of school is called "sophomore", it means wise fool. To assume you "know enough" not to finish your schooling is assuming you are wise enough, which is foolish; and a junior year is exactly that…. "I almost finished"
So are you going to almost do work for your customers?
Is there something you almost learned in turf grass management? Did you almost ID that pest and almost eradicate it?

What was the point of starting to begin with if you weren't going to finish?
There are already enough "almost, foolish and half assed" companies in existence….does your market need more?
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Old 04-10-2015, 06:15 AM
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Charles Charles is offline
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I would advise you to get a degree. Opens up many more options for making money. Depending on how large your accounts are, you will need a lot more of them to make a decent living. Then it will become a hard labor job
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Old 04-10-2015, 06:46 AM
recycledsole recycledsole is online now
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Wow a tough choice. If it's not going to help you, you can save that huge debt. However in sure something like a landscape or botany degree could help your future. See anyone can cut grass, but when you have specialized skills like design, ID, etc that you will learn in college, that will help elevate you above the competition. Just buzzing ideas off, of course only you know what is right.
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Old 04-10-2015, 11:33 AM
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TPendagast TPendagast is offline
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I would advise you to get a degree. Opens up many more options for making money. Depending on how large your accounts are, you will need a lot more of them to make a decent living. Then it will become a hard labor job
"having a degree" especially any degree isn't what it used to be anymore.
In most cases it's a financial trap.

But if you've already started and gotten THAT far, it's folly to quit now.
unless of course you have just seen the light halfway through Devry or ITT tech, by then you've figured out those "degrees" truly ARE worthless.

A Bachelors in turf science/agronomy or whichever green industry education being pursued, won't get you much in this industry. It is however a building bloc to a masters, but before pursuing a masters, Id find the job you'd want to get and then get THAT masters degree, simply because a masters becomes more focused.
Especially if you find a career in a support industry for the green, and you can run your maintenance company/venture on the side.

a bachelors (of any kind) can get you a decent managerial position at Target or Lowes in short order, again, running your maintenance company on the side.

that gives you the opportunity to grow slowly and healthy, without going into the panic of "I need customers now! drop prices to compete!!"

bear in mind, once you stop being a student, in about 6 months the loans come a-knocking looking for payment.
That's a hard thing to swallow when your only income is a fledgling business trying to grow.
A bachelors (or only part of one) doesn't give you the knowledge to be an expert or authority on anything…. it only gives you enough knowledge to be dangerous, mostly to your self.
Applied knowledge comes with more time, so you can't just wave college credits about declaring "I know what Im doing!!"
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Old 04-10-2015, 11:36 AM
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TPendagast TPendagast is offline
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Originally Posted by recycledsole View Post
Wow a tough choice. If it's not going to help you, you can save that huge debt. However in sure something like a landscape or botany degree could help your future. See anyone can cut grass, but when you have specialized skills like design, ID, etc that you will learn in college, that will help elevate you above the competition. Just buzzing ideas off, of course only you know what is right.
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hes not saving that much debt, he's already mostly through the program, he just needs to finish.
It's not a question of IF I go to college or start a business, it's a question of SHOULD I finish?

So he's already acquired most of the chunk of the debt.

With his degree, he's not going to come out the other end with skills in design; and ID etc is more applied knowledge than a classroom would have you think…and easily learned OJT and through state sponsored pesticide classes.
So the degree he's in, doesn't really carry that weight.
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  #9  
Old 04-10-2015, 12:17 PM
herler herler is online now
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One big problem is you haven't hit market saturation, so you don't know what your limits are from your perspective.
Right now in your mind there exists unlimited potential, there doesn't seem to be an end to the amount of work and cash in this Industry.
I know this feeling all too well, but the limits exist and they are real.

Not trying to tell you what to do, but you're looking at a career just starting out, we're talking 40 maybe 50 years...
Believe me, I've seen "passions" fizzle in a lot less time than that.
Especially when someone hits that market saturation wall, we're talking you could be feeling all dispassionate in a year or two from now.

You finish school and graduate, you always have a choice, for example should the passion fizzle.
You drop out now, you eliminate that choice and you're stuck even if your passion runs out on you.

Last edited by herler; 04-10-2015 at 12:24 PM.
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  #10  
Old 04-10-2015, 12:30 PM
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easy-lift guy easy-lift guy is online now
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Complete your schooling now, while you have time to comfortably grow and expand your business on your time schedule and not attempting to make up time lost due to never completing your degree. You have the rest of your adult life to work and pursue other interest. I believe not make the time to complete your schooling in the future since it will be less important in the short term.
All the best
easy-lift guy
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