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Old 03-05-2015, 08:58 PM
EarthSolutionsLLC EarthSolutionsLLC is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Oklahoma City, OK
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H2B, Visa, Questions....

I have a small landscaping company in Oklahoma. During April to November we have employed about 6 full-time employees not including myself the last couple years. I am looking to expand, therein lies my dilemma. I have the hardest time finding good, hard-working reliable workers that will show up every day and do a good job. I generally hire by word of mouth or CL.

In my experience someone from Mexico will show up every day, no complaints and get the job done 1.5x faster than anyone else . I currently employ all legal citizens and have a huge turnover rate no matter how much I pay. Some people call in if their cat is sick 3 weeks in a row and will get fired and not understand why. , not to mention stolen equipment, riding the clock, etc.

I've been looking into hiring a few H2B workers as a solution and know I have missed the spring deadline this year already but am thinking about using this next season. My questions are....
-Will I have to pay their room and board?
-Will I have to pay for their temporary visa?
I would love to hear from anyone here with some experience having H2B workers and how it has worked out.
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  #2  
Old 03-05-2015, 10:53 PM
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Snapper Pro Snapper Pro is offline
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Location: Tabor City NC
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I am in the same situation I would also love to know more about the H2b program an the requirements.
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  #3  
Old 03-05-2015, 11:16 PM
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tobylou8 tobylou8 is offline
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I don't know about the visa, but when I checked into it years ago, you had to provide housing and you had to stroke Uncle Sam a check based on the number of employees you need. Oh yeah, about your financials, heh,heh they want all that info too (unless it's been streamlined). One guy that did it said it's like a colonoscopy and root canal at the same time, but not as fun!!! I feel your pain on having reliable help and while I don't like the principal of paying off the gov't to have an otherwise illegal alien working for me, it has worked well for many companies.
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Old 08-23-2015, 10:12 PM
oqueoque oqueoque is offline
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I have the same questions as the OP. Plus what does this cost for the paper work and paying the recruiter? Also how much do the H2B workers get paid.? Anybody have any information?
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  #5  
Old 08-24-2015, 12:07 AM
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TPendagast TPendagast is offline
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Location: Wasilla, AK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EarthSolutionsLLC View Post
I have a small landscaping company in Oklahoma. During April to November we have employed about 6 full-time employees not including myself the last couple years. I am looking to expand, therein lies my dilemma. I have the hardest time finding good, hard-working reliable workers that will show up every day and do a good job. I generally hire by word of mouth or CL.

In my experience someone from Mexico will show up every day, no complaints and get the job done 1.5x faster than anyone else . I currently employ all legal citizens and have a huge turnover rate no matter how much I pay. Some people call in if their cat is sick 3 weeks in a row and will get fired and not understand why. , not to mention stolen equipment, riding the clock, etc.

I've been looking into hiring a few H2B workers as a solution and know I have missed the spring deadline this year already but am thinking about using this next season. My questions are....
-Will I have to pay their room and board?
-Will I have to pay for their temporary visa?
I would love to hear from anyone here with some experience having H2B workers and how it has worked out.
no, you do not have to pay their room and board,
but you DO have to make sure you have something set up for them when they arrive.
many employers own real estate and act as the employees land lords as well.
the employees are allowed to shack up where ever they want and are not required to use their employers digs. but its 99 percent likely they will.

depending on what state you live in, and area you are employing, there is a 50/50 chance they have family and friends already in your immediate area and will shack up there was well.
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Old 08-24-2015, 12:12 AM
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TPendagast TPendagast is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oqueoque View Post
I have the same questions as the OP. Plus what does this cost for the paper work and paying the recruiter? Also how much do the H2B workers get paid.? Anybody have any information?
the recruiter/paper work will cost no less than $3700.00, and possibly more.

the more workers you get, the less expensive it is PER worker.

none of this covers the cost of the government fees, or the air/bus fare. You are responsible for their travel door to door, from their home to your place of employment, BOTH ways.

the government is required (at your cost) to do a fair wage determination for your area.
the minimum you have to pay them will range from $12-14.50 per hour.

Rest assured there will be NO visa workers getting paid $9-$10 an hour.
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Old 08-24-2015, 12:47 AM
oqueoque oqueoque is offline
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Thanks, I was curious as to what the cost was, and it is not cheap. If I assume an overall cost of $5000 per worker. And they work 39 weeks or 9 months, 40 hours a week, it comes out to $3.20 an hour in cost, that I would need to add on to his pay for my overall cost.

Do you pay more for 9 months compared to 6 months?

You would think that adding $3.20 to $14 equaling $17.20 would get a dependable good worker in the USA, without the aggravation you have to go through for H2B.

I know you say pay more and I do. And I talked to you before about hiring people from Puerto Rico. I still have the one guy from there, who has been good.

I imagine,if I told someone from Puerto Rico, that I would pay them $17 an hour. They have to pay for there transportation and find a place to live, I would get a tremendous response, since the employment situation there is bad. Even at $16 an hour or less.
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  #8  
Old 08-24-2015, 06:02 PM
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ed2hess ed2hess is offline
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Location: Austin Texas 78727
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[QUOTE=oqueoque;5306934]

You would think that adding $3.20 to $14 equaling $17.20 would get a dependable good worker in the USA, without the aggravation you have to go through for H2B./QUOTE]

I have jo idea why you and many americans and our candidates think that? You can make $1000 for every american you can find that will last 6 months in lawn care and not be late for work more 10 times a month and not miss more than14 days in the 6 months. BTW PAY IS $17 PER HOUR?
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  #9  
Old 08-24-2015, 09:32 PM
Charity P. Charity P. is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Frederick, Maryland
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I am not in charge of the whole h2b process at our company, but I can tell you that it has worked amazingly well for us over the past 10 years. It was near impossible for us to find decent workers that showed up on time and every day. We are on the east coast near Washington D.C. so our area might have been a big part of our problem finding American workers. We pay our guys more than the average lawn guys around here and they are totally worth it! One bilingual worker we had is now getting his green card and helping us start a franchise in another state. The wages in most Latin countries are so low and the crime is so prevalent that we have no problem finding people wanting to be on the H2B program.

You need proof that you are advertising and attempting to hire American workers for a decent wage before you even get started, so you really aren't taking jobs from the locals. Talk to an H2B lawyer and start the process right away if you want to do it - your paperwork needs to be lined up perfectly for the government.

We rent out mobile homes to our guys but like someone else mentioned, the only requirement is that you have housing for them when they come.
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  #10  
Old 08-24-2015, 09:57 PM
oqueoque oqueoque is offline
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Location: NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charity P. View Post
I am not in charge of the whole h2b process at our company, but I can tell you that it has worked amazingly well for us over the past 10 years. It was near impossible for us to find decent workers that showed up on time and every day. We are on the east coast near Washington D.C. so our area might have been a big part of our problem finding American workers. We pay our guys more than the average lawn guys around here and they are totally worth it! One bilingual worker we had is now getting his green card and helping us start a franchise in another state. The wages in most Latin countries are so low and the crime is so prevalent that we have no problem finding people wanting to be on the H2B program.

You need proof that you are advertising and attempting to hire American workers for a decent wage before you even get started, so you really aren't taking jobs from the locals. Talk to an H2B lawyer and start the process right away if you want to do it - your paperwork needs to be lined up perfectly for the government.

We rent out mobile homes to our guys but like someone else mentioned, the only requirement is that you have housing for them when they come.
How many H2B workers do you have, roughly. It sounds like you have a good amount, that would reduce the companies per worker cost. I assume that based on TP's statement that the more workers you get, the less your per worker cost is.

As I said before, if my cost per worker ended up costing me $3.20 per hour, before any payroll taxes and workers comp, on top of the prevailing wage, that would eat up a lot of my profit. If it was half of $3.20, I might be able to absorb that.

I know you said you where not in charge, but I was curious if you knew how many you have there.

It is tough to hire a couple of American citizens. Trying to hire 10, 20 or more must be a nightmare.

I will take your advice and talk to a H2B lawyer, as long as the talk is free. I will need to hire 2 or more people next year and would like to know my options ahead of time. Thanks.
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