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  #21  
Old 02-09-2014, 10:49 AM
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It all depends on what you are spraying

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Modern Chemistry formulations are leaning to lower Gallons per Thousand applications. However I am Old School and Like 5 G/K when doing Liquid fert. My lawns are mostly St Augustine and have a heavy thatch. Plus I have a lot of chinch bug pressure. Therefore I want to fire hose the yard. Most others in my area are doing 2 to 3 G/K so they can get more yards out of the same size sprayer.

Most all Pesticide Labels will give the recommend carrier rate. You need to pay attention to those rate when adding them to a Fert & Squirt tank.

When applying a liquid fertilizer, the more carrier the more even the distribution. The truth is 5 G/K is a lot more forgiving than 0.5 G/K. You can either Stripe or burn a lawn a lot easier with Higher % A.I. than a lower.

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  #22  
Old 02-09-2014, 01:02 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LawnsharkMB View Post
One thing to mention at the golf course we are spoon feeding. Youre only putting out around .15 lbs N per k at 1.2 gallons per k not watered after every 10 days. I'm gonna want to spray .5 N per k on my lawns.

Does liquid fertilizer have less potential to burn than soluble and can you get ammonium sulfate and potassium nitrate in liquid?
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If improperly formulated, a liquid will burn a lawn right before your eyes. 0.5 lb of N will do that if your spray volume is too low. One brand of liquid fertilizer published some recommendations that I see you are following on the golf greens. 1 lb of N may be applied in 10 gallons of water. Depending on the N source, that can be a lot of dry material in that water. Under my conditions, if I cannot count on a good irrigation system to water things in, my limit is more like 0.5 lb per 10 gallons. Those mixes putting down 1/2-3/4 lb of N in 2 gallons are applied immediately before each zone of irrigation. I also do not add postemergent herbicides to a fertilizer. The herbicides often require adjuvants that will cause burn if combined with a concentrated fertilizer solution. Also, I find that herbicides work best at 1/2-1 gallon per 1000 applied through air inducted flat fan nozzles. Straight fertilizers are going through flood jets or high volume solid cone nozzles.
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  #23  
Old 02-09-2014, 01:46 PM
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..

By running irrigation both BEFORE and AFTER application you can apply fert at a real low carrier rate. Fact is a solution will automatically bind with clear water already on top of the ground and soak in to it's level.

Be careful about watering after, especially if you want a foliar treatment. Too much irrigation will wash fertilizer AWAY not IN. Like so many things it is not WHAT you do, but HOW you do it.

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  #24  
Old 02-09-2014, 01:56 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
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Good point. Liquids are very bad on grass that is dry. Ideal situation is for me to apply behind an irrigation system and then short cycle it to water in after.
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  #25  
Old 02-10-2014, 03:15 PM
bcg bcg is offline
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Thanks to everyone for your help, this ended up being a more informative thread than I had hoped.

I ended up using my blue nozzle and setting the pressure at 120PSI and I'm getting exactly 3 gallons per 1,000.
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  #26  
Old 02-10-2014, 04:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bcg View Post
Thanks to everyone for your help, this ended up being a more informative thread than I had hoped.

I ended up using my blue nozzle and setting the pressure at 120PSI and I'm getting exactly 3 gallons per 1,000.
Just be careful with the blue nozzle if there is any wind at all. Produces a very fine stream so the wind moves it pretty easily and especially with that kind of pressure. That tip is also bad about getting small pieces of grass in the nozzle tip holes that will make the chemical move around a little easier.

Is that 120psi deadhead pressure or operating pressure?
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  #27  
Old 02-10-2014, 05:01 PM
bcg bcg is offline
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120 static, dynamic is closer to 80 at the gauge. By the time it runs through 350' of hose, I'd bet it's more like 40 - 50 at the gun.
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  #28  
Old 02-10-2014, 05:17 PM
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3gallons per 1,000 just seems like a lot coming out of a blue tip. I use the GNC gun also and I get 2 / K out of the yellow tip. Set on 80 psi deadhead and 35 psi operating. Do you walk slow? Not being a smart one, just trying to figure out the differences.
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  #29  
Old 02-10-2014, 05:31 PM
bcg bcg is offline
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I don't know, it takes me about 60 seconds to cover 1,000 sq/ft. I might be slow, I've seen a few posts where people say they are doing 1,000k in 30 seconds but I'm not in that big of a hurry. I've got 18 applications to do this week (about 70k sq/ft) and it should only take me about 4 hours, including driving. I have about a 50 mile round trip.

Looking at the specs on the nozzle, it does seem a little high but I measured it out to 3GPM.
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  #30  
Old 02-10-2014, 05:46 PM
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All that matters is that it is callibrated to you. That's probably pretty close at 60 seconds though.
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