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  #101  
Old 03-18-2014, 04:06 PM
ReddensLawnCare ReddensLawnCare is online now
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Location: Charlotte, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BossPlowMaster View Post
Thanks! And belive me im trying to learn....thats why I study lawnsite like a Bible.
As long as you do t get the two confused you should be good to go. Ha
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  #102  
Old 03-18-2014, 05:16 PM
32vld 32vld is offline
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Originally Posted by wannaquitmydayjob View Post
Brandon..They are = they're...,yes... but "their customers.." is correct due to "their" being possessive... They're friends... they are their friends... your friends are over there... you may want to stick with cutting grass instead of correcting posts..IMO
Why is it that the Spelling Nazi's and the Grammar Gestapo feel it is their place to be rude?
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  #103  
Old 03-18-2014, 05:17 PM
BrandonG BrandonG is offline
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Location: Michigan
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I think maybe "lowballers" might be human nature's defense against skyrocketing prices.

If no one bid low, then everything would be higher, doesn't that seem to make sense?

It's the same in the trucking industry. You have these foreigners coming over, many from eastern europe and russia, putting these POS trucks on the road, bid low, don't pay taxes, pay their employees as contractors on a 1099, and keeping rates low, pushing a lot of legitimate, professional owner ops out of the market.

The big difference is that generally freight brokers don't care who bids, they go with whoever takes the low rate first, and if they can't find anyone in time then they have to raise the rate to get it moved. They don't care about quality of the truck, the driver, etc, as long as it gets there on time. Shippers and receivers don't care much either, as long as its on time. They don't care if the driver is running without a log book, or driving over hours of service, their service record, accident records, as long as they have their proof of insurance, they're good to go.

When you're dealing with clients looking for lawn service, quality is a much bigger factor that is considered by the customer. So I guess I would say, just be glad you're not in the trucking industry. Lowballers run rampant there.
The only good side about that industry is that there is still a small, but growing shortage of trucks. And it's more expensive and risky to get into this industry.
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  #104  
Old 03-18-2014, 05:21 PM
BrandonG BrandonG is offline
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About the grammar, I just find it very annoying when people use "your" and "you're" improperly, same with "their", "they're" and "there".

We learn this stuff in 2nd grade. I can't take anyone seriously who spells and uses grammar at a 2nd grade level.
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  #105  
Old 03-18-2014, 05:27 PM
32vld 32vld is offline
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Originally Posted by Bryan27 View Post
Well, here is the dictionary definition of the word "lowball":
low∑ball [loh-bawl] Show IPA


noun

1.

Cards. a game of draw poker in which the player having the lowest-ranking hand wins the pot.

verb (used with object)

2.

to deliberately estimate a lower price for (a service or merchandise) than one intends to charge: to lowball the cost of a move.


3.

to give a false estimate or bid for.

verb (used without object)

4.

to engage in lowballing.

adjective

5.

engaged in or characteristic of lowballing: a lowball bid.


So, by DEFINITION it is a deceptive business practice. I'll give you that deception can be a business strategy, but beyond that, there is nothing good or endearing about the practice of lowballing. Someone who's business strategy is to lowball, very well may know exactly what they are doing, we call those people con men or scammers around here.

What do you call a person who's business is run with no insurance and pay no tax so they're able to charge half of what the legitimate businesses around them charge for the same work?

Problem with dictionary's is that they ignore that a language is a living thing. It changes and does not stay static. Citing a definition does not always yield the most current usage or all of the various meanings for each word.

Many a time dictionary's have been decades behind.
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  #106  
Old 03-18-2014, 05:34 PM
32vld 32vld is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grassmonkey0311 View Post
Reading the responses reminds me of last year when I saw one "go out of business"

I was doing a regular route and often pass this guy. He had a truck and trailer, and some old beat up ztr. In the truck were 2 spanish guys. Someone crashed into them, wrecking the trailer and mower, also messed up the truck a little. The driver was on the side of the road throwing a fit like a little kid. I drove by laughing. Never saw him again.
To laugh at someone's misfortune?

That could of been a guy starting out, legal, with no more capital to come back.
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  #107  
Old 03-18-2014, 05:42 PM
BrandonG BrandonG is offline
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32vld - I think the point is that the guy didn't have insurance, and so he completely lost his equipment and vehicle.

At least that is what I understood from the post. In my state, if you don't have insurance, then you're out of luck, whether or not the accident was your fault....but you also have to have proof of insurance to renew your license plate. So it may or may not be the case. Or maybe the guy had insurance but not business insurance on the vehicle, and knew he would not be covered since he was using the vehicle for commercial purposes. Who knows?

But you know what? It has always been that special thing about America where if you work hard and do whatever you can to succeed, then its possible, no matter the circumstances. It doesn't matter if there are "lowballers" everywhere, because where there is a will, there is a way...from what I've read, anyways. I guess one of those things that are more easily read than done.
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  #108  
Old 03-18-2014, 05:47 PM
Bryan27 Bryan27 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 32vld View Post
Problem with dictionary's is that they ignore that a language is a living thing. It changes and does not stay static. Citing a definition does not always yield the most current usage or all of the various meanings for each word.

Many a time dictionary's have been decades behind.
Agreed, if you look at one of my previous posts on this thread I gave my own definition of the word and was told I was incorrect according to "wiki". I accept that my definition isn't exactly the way the dictionary or wiki define it, but I think that my definition is how the word "lowballer" is commonly used in our context.
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  #109  
Old 03-18-2014, 06:30 PM
SchannaultROLC's Avatar
SchannaultROLC SchannaultROLC is offline
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It's supply and demand. Basic economics teaches us that if someone wants something, they'll pay for it.
Now, when they find it at a cheaper price, they'll go for the better deal.
Its not beating the lowballers you have to focus on, its finding the right customers. You have to focus more on getting grandfathered into a neighborhood than kicking the lowballer out.
If a customer just wants the cheapest price on a mow n' blow, then unfortunately that's not really the client base you should trying to be establishing.
Because if their is one thing that beats the human nature of price shopping, its brand loyalty.
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  #110  
Old 03-18-2014, 07:49 PM
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Snyder's Lawn Inc Snyder's Lawn Inc is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BossPlowMaster View Post
You all are funny. I thank the ones that support me. I did 3 installs this past year which brought me in just over 45k (crew of 2 including me). I mowed all season long running a crew of 2 guys and 2 mowers and mowed on average of 17 lawns a day 3 1/2 days a week and that brought in just shy of
18k. Not to mention all of the gardening and around the house bed maintenence we did which brought in 6k and don't forget the 45k I made on snow removal this past year(1 truck, me and 1-2 guys). Call it bs if you want but I did it and I sure as hell worked my a$$ off to do it. Am I saying this is going to be an average year? No but I thought it was something I could be proud of. Haha guess I'll just put head down and act like a whipped puppy.
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Your company is going live on the snow Since your from a state that has lots of snow. That's where your company will grow from is the winter income. Your winters are longer then your summer?
Good job on the winter
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