Register free!
Search
 
     

The Green Industry's Resource Center


Click for Weather
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-04-2014, 04:45 PM
cutman2000's Avatar
cutman2000 cutman2000 is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 190
Dying Oak Tree

I mulched a 12 foot Oak Tree about 3 years ago, and every year since(for a customer). It appears to be dying at the top. And the buds look a little slow this Spring, but visible. I tried moving the mulch back, away from the bottom of the tree, creating a bowl like look. I think the root tips that are under the tree, which would probably be under the mulch directly now, are not getting enough water, I figured. To make matters worse, this customers house is sitting on bad, clay like soil. He mentioned something about the land was dumping grounds for the city, so he's aware of the poor soil.

If fertilizing is an option, what type?

What options do I have? I was thinking:
#1. Extra Water/fertilize
#2. Take the mulch up, fertilize
#3. Cut the top, water heavily, fertilize
#4. Cut off the top, take up the mulch, water heavily, fertilize

Thanks
__________________
Ford F150 ex cab
12x6 Trailer
5x8 Trailer
(1) Zero Turn
(2) Husqvarna Packpack Blower
(2) Stihl stick edger
(1) walk behind edger
(5) weedeaters
(3) handheld blower
(4) walk behind mowers
(1) attachable aerator
(2) 22" Husqvarna hedge trimmer
(1) college degree
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-05-2014, 09:08 PM
Busybee Lawns's Avatar
Busybee Lawns Busybee Lawns is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Fayette &Green County
Posts: 82
Did you plant the tree or mulched 3 years ago?

what type of oak?

First Thing Too do is a soil ph test around the tree first
Many species prefer slightly acidic soil

One of the main negative effects of a mismatch between oak tree varieties and pH levels is iron chlorosis. Iron chlorosis occurs when oak trees can't absorb enough iron and causes yellowing of leaves. In severe cases, the entire tree becomes defoliated, making it more susceptible to disease. Alkaline soils bind iron, making it unavailable to plants. Oak species, such as pin, white or red oak, that grow best in acid soils will likely suffer from chlorosis in alkaline soils.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-06-2014, 09:08 AM
cutman2000's Avatar
cutman2000 cutman2000 is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 190
I didn't plant the tree, it was there when I started service, three years ago. It was about 10 or 11 feet. It may be 12-13ft now. I will check the ph and find out what type of oak.

Do you think I should be concerned about the mulch over the clay like soil?
__________________
Ford F150 ex cab
12x6 Trailer
5x8 Trailer
(1) Zero Turn
(2) Husqvarna Packpack Blower
(2) Stihl stick edger
(1) walk behind edger
(5) weedeaters
(3) handheld blower
(4) walk behind mowers
(1) attachable aerator
(2) 22" Husqvarna hedge trimmer
(1) college degree
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
fertilizer , mulch beds , oaks , tree irrigation

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.comô - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:45 PM.

Page generated in 0.07434 seconds with 7 queries