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  #11  
Old 04-07-2014, 09:15 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Location: District 9 CA
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Brandon,

First thing I would be thinking here is to reduce the amount of turf you have substantially. Reason being, sandy soil means you will be using an enormous amount of water to keep any turf respectably green. Design the yard so you have only the amount of turf you absolutely need and will use, and the rest of the yard gets designed using regionally appropriate plants that will require very little, if any, supplemental water.

With respect to your supply specs, you could go either with a standard rotor or MP, however your choice should based strictly on your soil (steady state infiltration rate) and environmental conditions (wind). With the slope and likely windy conditions, I would probably lean more towards MPRotator that a standard rotor.

Depending on wind and area being watered, you could space MP3500 at 30 feet along the edges and corners, and MP3000 full circles at 27 feet if needed. If you have turf from top to bottom of the slope, the correct way to irrigate this would be to have at least three hydrozones ..... top, middle, and bottom of the slope assuming full sun on all areas. That means a minimum of 3 valves .... the number of valves you actually need will depend on your final irrigated area and sprinkler choice. You WILL need bodies with pressure regulating stems and check valves.

Finally, if you measured 18 GPM at 50 PSI, design for no more than 15 GPM.

Last edited by Kiril; 04-07-2014 at 09:21 AM.
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  #12  
Old 04-07-2014, 09:39 PM
txirrigation txirrigation is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiril View Post
Brandon,

First thing I would be thinking here is to reduce the amount of turf you have substantially. Reason being, sandy soil means you will be using an enormous amount of water to keep any turf respectably green. Design the yard so you have only the amount of turf you absolutely need and will use, and the rest of the yard gets designed using regionally appropriate plants that will require very little, if any, supplemental water.

With respect to your supply specs, you could go either with a standard rotor or MP, however your choice should based strictly on your soil (steady state infiltration rate) and environmental conditions (wind). With the slope and likely windy conditions, I would probably lean more towards MPRotator that a standard rotor.

Depending on wind and area being watered, you could space MP3500 at 30 feet along the edges and corners, and MP3000 full circles at 27 feet if needed. If you have turf from top to bottom of the slope, the correct way to irrigate this would be to have at least three hydrozones ..... top, middle, and bottom of the slope assuming full sun on all areas. That means a minimum of 3 valves .... the number of valves you actually need will depend on your final irrigated area and sprinkler choice. You WILL need bodies with pressure regulating stems and check valves.

Finally, if you measured 18 GPM at 50 PSI, design for no more than 15 GPM.
Kiril nailed it.
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  #13  
Old 04-08-2014, 01:21 AM
chi_town60608 chi_town60608 is offline
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Thanks guys. I'll see what kind of design I can come up with.
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  #14  
Old 04-09-2014, 08:57 PM
Irrigation Contractor Irrigation Contractor is offline
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I guess I am missing something with the MP's and I do not see how the wind is a factor with the area surrounded by trees and a house.

I know TX puts in a bunch of systems as do we, so I will agree to disagree here. I guess that is why nobody wants to help around here, it always turns into a pissing match
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  #15  
Old 04-09-2014, 09:20 PM
Irrigation Contractor Irrigation Contractor is offline
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One more note, I guess I need to stay in my own little world and not talk work outside of work.

Good luck to the OP, some good advice from the others so follow their recommendations.
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  #16  
Old 04-09-2014, 10:52 PM
chi_town60608 chi_town60608 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Irrigation Contractor View Post
I guess I am missing something with the MP's and I do not see how the wind is a factor with the area surrounded by trees and a house.
What do you mean by "missing something with the MPs"?

I can tell you that the wind is a HUGE factor when it blows. It gets pretty stagnant overall here in the summer, but when there is wind, it would definitely be a factor regardless of the surroundings.

Thanks for chiming in. I appreciate any and all input!

chi_town
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  #17  
Old 04-14-2014, 07:36 PM
chi_town60608 chi_town60608 is offline
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Drip question

I'm working on my design and have a couple of questions.

How do I get drip from one bed to another? For example, in the drawing, you can see the patio on the back of the house. There is a flower bed on both sides of the opening from the back patio to the back yard. That opening is concrete and roughly 6 feet wide. There is also a flower bed in the bottom left of the picture. I'd prefer to water these all in the same drip zone, but I've went through like 40 pages of posts and their subsequent posts, but can't find pictures or an explanation as to how to do this. The only way I have come up with doing it is to run an 1804 to each bed and then use the RB pop-up converter in each bed. I'm positive there have to be other ways of doing this which explains this post.

For the drip zone(s), do any of you have a preference on zone valve to use? Or, do you have a brand and/or model that you will NOT use again after experience?

Thanks again guys!

chi_town
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  #18  
Old 04-14-2014, 08:23 PM
txirrigation txirrigation is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chi_town60608 View Post
I'm working on my design and have a couple of questions.

How do I get drip from one bed to another? For example, in the drawing, you can see the patio on the back of the house. There is a flower bed on both sides of the opening from the back patio to the back yard. That opening is concrete and roughly 6 feet wide. There is also a flower bed in the bottom left of the picture. I'd prefer to water these all in the same drip zone, but I've went through like 40 pages of posts and their subsequent posts, but can't find pictures or an explanation as to how to do this. The only way I have come up with doing it is to run an 1804 to each bed and then use the RB pop-up converter in each bed. I'm positive there have to be other ways of doing this which explains this post.

For the drip zone(s), do any of you have a preference on zone valve to use? Or, do you have a brand and/or model that you will NOT use again after experience?

Thanks again guys!

chi_town
Install the drip valve in a central location, run PVC to the beds and convert from PVC to drip. You can convert from PVC to drip tubing using male/female threaded adapters.

I always preferred rainbird drip assemblies. Whichever brand make sure you used a valve with a filter and pressure reducer.
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  #19  
Old 04-14-2014, 08:56 PM
chi_town60608 chi_town60608 is offline
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Quote:
run PVC to the beds and convert from PVC to drip.
Alright, that is what I was thinking, but didn't know if it was sound practice. The only issue I have with that is that there is no 'central location' that I can put the valve and box that won't be largely conspicuous. Would it be possible to put the valve on the side of the yard, run it to the first bed and tee it, run to the next bed, and then tee it one last time to the third bed?

Thanks for your help.

chi_town
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  #20  
Old 04-14-2014, 09:09 PM
txirrigation txirrigation is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chi_town60608 View Post
Alright, that is what I was thinking, but didn't know if it was sound practice. The only issue I have with that is that there is no 'central location' that I can put the valve and box that won't be largely conspicuous. Would it be possible to put the valve on the side of the yard, run it to the first bed and tee it, run to the next bed, and then tee it one last time to the third bed?

Thanks for your help.

chi_town
Try to locate it where the pipe runs will be equal in length. Also you want to try to avoid stringing the beds, the further down the line the worse the pressure.

If it isn't going to be aesthetically pleasing to locate the valve centrally you can always run a "main" lateral line to a central location and split off from there. This may mean running the main lateral past a bed that will have drip and doubling back from the central split location.
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