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  #1  
Old 04-20-2014, 01:46 PM
addfellow addfellow is offline
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Can anything grow on huge mound of oak tree grindings?

I have a customer who had a tree removal service take down a 80' dead red oak. They left a giant version of a pitcher's mound composed of stump grindings. The mound's been there 8 months, been through this hellacious Michigan winter. Now the customer wants me to grow grass, or maybe some wildflowers there. I'm assuming the mound is too damn acidic for anything to grow. Any suggestions? Excavating the mound and replacing with soil is not an option ( too costly ). Thanks.
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Old 04-20-2014, 01:56 PM
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P.Services P.Services is online now
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If they can't afford to remove grindings and put new topsoil in your wasting your time with them.
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Old 04-20-2014, 02:14 PM
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easy-lift guy easy-lift guy is online now
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If they can't afford to remove grindings and put new topsoil in your wasting your time with them.
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Agreed. I am still at a loss for any reason why customers have no common sense or seemingly play dumb for god knows why.
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Old 04-20-2014, 04:26 PM
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alldayrj alldayrj is online now
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Refer them to bbirdseedd
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Old 04-20-2014, 10:30 PM
MikeT MikeT is offline
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If you absolutely can't remove the mound suggest burying potted plants in extra large containers with extra soil as a temporary solution. Low growing shrubs or trailing groundcovers like English Ivy or Euonymous. Camouflage the chips with mulch after adding some nitrogen. Keep watered throughout the season. You could also hide the mound by surrounding it with large ornamental grasses.
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Old 04-20-2014, 10:55 PM
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Snyder's Lawn Inc Snyder's Lawn Inc is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by addfellow View Post
I have a customer who had a tree removal service take down a 80' dead red oak. They left a giant version of a pitcher's mound composed of stump grindings. The mound's been there 8 months, been through this hellacious Michigan winter. Now the customer wants me to grow grass, or maybe some wildflowers there. I'm assuming the mound is too damn acidic for anything to grow. Any suggestions? Excavating the mound and replacing with soil is not an option ( too costly ). Thanks.
The first mistake is the company that did the grinding should removed it and replace it with top soil in the hole

Only option there is to remove it and add soil If they don't want to Walk Run away
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Old 04-20-2014, 10:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeT View Post
If you absolutely can't remove the mound suggest burying potted plants in extra large containers with extra soil as a temporary solution. Low growing shrubs or trailing groundcovers like English Ivy or Euonymous. Camouflage the chips with mulch after adding some nitrogen. Keep watered throughout the season. You could also hide the mound by surrounding it with large ornamental grasses.
im going to add to this a little bit, i think its a great idea to make a garden bed out of it. wrap the rootballs of the plants in burlap or use potted plants with peat pots (the brown cardboard-like ones)
try ornamental grasses or like he said, some drought resistant plants like euonymus and groundcovers that dont actually need soil to root. a giant mound of variegated euonymus will look 100 times better than a mound of bark chips. the chips will decompose over time.
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Old 04-24-2014, 08:03 PM
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Do not assume it is too acidic. That is an assumption. Get it tested.
I suspect a bit of topsoil--or any soil--would allow at least some grass to grow, (if there is plenty of sunlight). If you can grow weeds--you can grow grass. Grass will grow in beach sand--provided it is watered and fertilized regularly. After all many greenhouse plants are grown in soil-free mixes. Peat moss, perlite, vermiculate and sand. Irrigation is critical--water will run through in a few hours, so frequent water is crucial. And--the water will tend to take nutrients with it. So slow-release nitrogen will be helpful, as will frequent applications of potassium. Use sod for quicker establishment, and probably get paid sooner.
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Old 04-25-2014, 07:18 AM
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that sounds about right..

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If they can't afford to remove grindings and put new topsoil in your wasting your time with them.
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  #10  
Old 04-25-2014, 07:32 AM
sjessen sjessen is online now
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One of my customers had the exact same situation as what the op has related. He did nothing at all. Just let the grindings rot. 5 years or so later the mound is gone, he seeded the area and grass is growing just fine. Was really ugly for a while but it looks like the rest of the yard now.
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