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  #21  
Old 04-25-2014, 03:08 PM
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Georgia Lawn Georgia Lawn is offline
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That's why your the DOC. Thank You
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  #22  
Old 04-25-2014, 03:56 PM
Skipster Skipster is offline
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Originally Posted by Georgia Lawn View Post
Green Doctor you mentioned 1/2% MSO and not sticker. Do you think something like LI700 from Loveland would do any good or only use MSO?
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The Certainty label says:

6.4 Surfactants and Adjuvants

Use a non-ionic surfactant at 0.25 to 0.5 percent by volume (1 to 2 quarts per 100 gallons of spray solution). Use only non-ionic surfactants that contain at least 90 percent active ingredient. Do not use non-ionic surfactants or other additives that alter the pH of the spray solution below pH 5. Use of surfactants that contain díLimonene, methylated seed oil, or COC (crop oil concentrate) may cause temporary turf discoloration.

**************

Why would you want to use MSO with this product?

Using MSO won't improve efficacy (if it did, it would be recommended on the label) and it could cause damage.

These kinds of mistakes are what keeps the pros in business.
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  #23  
Old 04-26-2014, 12:27 AM
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ted putnam ted putnam is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipster View Post
The Certainty label says:

6.4 Surfactants and Adjuvants

Use a non-ionic surfactant at 0.25 to 0.5 percent by volume (1 to 2 quarts per 100 gallons of spray solution). Use only non-ionic surfactants that contain at least 90 percent active ingredient. Do not use non-ionic surfactants or other additives that alter the pH of the spray solution below pH 5. Use of surfactants that contain díLimonene, methylated seed oil, or COC (crop oil concentrate) may cause temporary turf discoloration.

**************

Why would you want to use MSO with this product?

Using MSO won't improve efficacy (if it did, it would be recommended on the label) and it could cause damage.

These kinds of mistakes are what keeps the pros in business.
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  #24  
Old 04-26-2014, 03:18 AM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
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  #25  
Old 04-26-2014, 03:22 AM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
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Originally Posted by Georgia Lawn View Post
"Why not just use the scale (or volumetric measurement tool provided by the manufacturer) back inside your shop"

He might be making his mix specific to that yard. I do this sometimes and I also have to use a scale on my tailgate. If one customer is ate up with sedge or mixture of hard to control weeds, a whole tank of that mixed up at the shop can get really expensive really fast.especially if you have other yards to treat that do not need those chemicals. I'd much rather be a 1/4 of a gram off on a lawn from wind disturbance than put tons of uneeded chemicals down.

Mixing at the shop is way easier though that is for sure.
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If it is so windy, you cannot get your scale to zero, here's your sign. Another one is if when attempting to pour into a measuring cup, the concentrate goes sideways. Yes, I have been asked about that by others in the business. They leave with a new hole. Spraying when it is windy
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Sell not virtue to purchase wealth, nor Liberty to purchase power.
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  #26  
Old 04-26-2014, 07:48 AM
Skipster Skipster is offline
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All it takes is a 1 mph breeze to vary the reading on a gram scale.

Either you don't spray when the wind reaches 1 mph or you have a very poor gram scale.
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  #27  
Old 04-26-2014, 07:49 AM
Skipster Skipster is offline
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Originally Posted by ted putnam View Post
Sure -- it keeps us pros in business because we get called out to fix all the rookie mistakes (like using MSO just because it sounds cool).
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  #28  
Old 04-26-2014, 11:58 AM
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ted putnam ted putnam is offline
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Actually "LI 700" sounds more cool than "MSO". Maybe I should switch to it. Then, at least I'll sound much more cool when I am talking about surfactants.

I mean, who cares if it works, as long as it sounds cool, right?

Skip, I think you disagree with most people on here(especially greendoctor) in an effort to stand out from the crowd...no matter what. And, you're willing to make silly statements like the one above in order to do that...

I've been treating lawns for 23 yrs and never used MSO until 2 yrs ago when I saw that it was recommended for use with quinclorac. There was a significant difference in how well it worked vs. other surfactant so I tried it with other herbicides and the difference was big. I'm not sure whether its because it is a modified vegetable oil and the plants more readily absorb the material or what the reason is. The fact is, it works and it works better than any other surfactant I have used. Many herbicides cause temporary discoloration no matter what is used with them. There's no way to avoid that. Explain this to the customer on the front end and this should be non-issue. This is the real difference between a "professional" and a "rookie"
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  #29  
Old 04-26-2014, 01:48 PM
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Turf Dawg Turf Dawg is offline
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I must be a Uber DA because I puts me some MSO in about everything except Speedzone.

I likes me sum Peach ice cream.
What flavor you like Ted?

I bet we are both wrong to some
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  #30  
Old 04-26-2014, 01:52 PM
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fl-landscapes fl-landscapes is offline
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Hey Ted, I was thinking of starting a new line of surfactants I'm going to name it "the super nizza wicked piza surfactaroni juice" I mean that's about as cool a sounding name I could come up with but seeing as that's the deciding factor I may be a billionaire over night. someones inferiority complex has acted up again I see.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ted putnam View Post
Actually "LI 700" sounds more cool than "MSO". Maybe I should switch to it. Then, at least I'll sound much more cool when I am talking about surfactants.

I mean, who cares if it works, as long as it sounds cool, right?

Skip, I think you disagree with most people on here(especially greendoctor) in an effort to stand out from the crowd...no matter what. And, you're willing to make silly statements like the one above in order to do that...

I've been treating lawns for 23 yrs and never used MSO until 2 yrs ago when I saw that it was recommended for use with quinclorac. There was a significant difference in how well it worked vs. other surfactant so I tried it with other herbicides and the difference was big. I'm not sure whether its because it is a modified vegetable oil and the plants more readily absorb the material or what the reason is. The fact is, it works and it works better than any other surfactant I have used. Many herbicides cause temporary discoloration no matter what is used with them. There's no way to avoid that. Explain this to the customer on the front end and this should be non-issue. This is the real difference between a "professional" and a "rookie"
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