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  #1  
Old 06-10-2014, 09:42 PM
ArTurf ArTurf is online now
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Accu-sync users

If you've used these which one do you prefer, the fixed or adjustable model?
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Old 06-16-2014, 09:16 PM
ArTurf ArTurf is online now
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Wow, no one uses pressure regulating valves? Before this latest system I've never had to worry about excess pressure but I'm looking at 90 psi before RP. Just wondering if I put the 50 psi model on my rotor zones will the rotors actually be working at 50? I cranked up the 1st zone we installed and it was misting noticably.
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  #3  
Old 06-17-2014, 07:27 AM
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Wet_Boots Wet_Boots is online now
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Nothing unique about it. Toro has one. Upscale Irritrol valves have one. So does Rainbird and Weathermatic. They work. The downside can be a slow oscillation in pressure, as the valve tries to lock in on the set pressure. (more of a problem the lower the set pressure is)
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Old 06-18-2014, 12:12 AM
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cjohn2000 cjohn2000 is offline
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Ive used both, I like the adjustable, saves me from stocking a wide range of different pressures. The only thing I can say is if your manually turning the valve on at the valve to use the solenoid as the bleed screw wont be regulated.

The only valve I havent tried is Toro's P220. Ive seen one that a rep had, If I remember the pressure regulation is more consistent by placing the regulator on the incoming side.

http://www.toro.com/en-us/profession...d=P-220-Series
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Old 06-18-2014, 11:36 AM
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I certainly don't look to add a regulator to a 90 psi supply, what with an RPZ and water meter and electric valves, and maybe a long supply line between street and meter, subtracting 20+ psi at a minimum.
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  #6  
Old 06-18-2014, 03:40 PM
enorl76 enorl76 is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wet_Boots View Post
I certainly don't look to add a regulator to a 90 psi supply, what with an RPZ and water meter and electric valves, and maybe a long supply line between street and meter, subtracting 20+ psi at a minimum.
So you're going to increase the flow velocity and introduce water hammer? That sounds odd.

Using smaller pipe to create friction and bring down the dynamic water pressure isn't a good recipe for longevity, IMO.
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Old 06-18-2014, 04:19 PM
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Wet_Boots Wet_Boots is online now
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On your best day on planet Earth, you will not prevent 20 psi being lost from supply to sprinkler head, no matter what flow velocities exist in your work. Add it up. RPZ + master valve + zone valve + pipe loses + swing pipe and fittings is enough to reach 20 psi, and that includes nothing of what's lost in the line from street to water meter to system tie in.

If you fear to have a possible 65 psi in your sprinkler zones you need to find another line of work.
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  #8  
Old 06-18-2014, 06:24 PM
ArTurf ArTurf is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wet_Boots View Post
I certainly don't look to add a regulator to a 90 psi supply, what with an RPZ and water meter and electric valves, and maybe a long supply line between street and meter, subtracting 20+ psi at a minimum.
I see what you're saying but what will probably be the largest zone I was getting 70 psi dynamic.
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  #9  
Old 06-19-2014, 05:47 AM
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You can live with 70 psi in a rotor zone, but a flow control master/zone valve might be called for. The difficult thing might be to avoid the temptation to exploit the high pressure to increase head spacing, because neighborhood pressure might decrease in the years to come.

For the common residential systems, this regulator-valve concept has the problem of not fitting the standard zone valves I want to use exclusively.
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  #10  
Old 06-19-2014, 06:35 AM
ArTurf ArTurf is online now
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I'm going to put an adjustable Accu-sync on the master valve and will use individual set models on spray zones.
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