Register free!
Search
 
     

The Green Industry's Resource Center


Click for Weather
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-06-2014, 07:48 PM
CND23 CND23 is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Schenectady, NY
Posts: 8
Help. Flower beds in full bloom.

Hey all, I have a repeat customer that I had done two spring cleanups for and would like to continue doing business with. Their current project inquiry is "Weeding & Mulching" the flower beds (I think most of us know 9 times out of 10 that means they let a small forest consume these areas and were supposed to show up with a magic wand and turn it into a landscape again.)
Normally, if they are in condition to where they can be restored to a presentable state we will bid on it, and renovate them.

However, This particular job does not appear to have a simple solution to me, and this is where I could use advice on what others here would propose to do with these beds. Because I believe they want to keep the cost minimal. So that doesn't leave the option of rooting the perennial mess and completely redoing the beds because I think it would be way more then they want to spend.

These are photos of the beds around the house at the begining of spring, and photos of them now. Clearly it's perennial mayhem and their is no room for mulch or to even rework the ground. Lilies of the valley and hostas are rooted right up to where you would trench the edges and beyond, you can see them growing in the random pile of pavers and stone as well.

I'm meeting with them this week and would like to give them some cost effective options. What I'm considering we propose is-

> Remove and Relocate paver stone and landscape rocks.

> Rooting all the perennials where we would edge the mulch bed.

> Brush cut remaining perennial vegetaion to ground level. Other then what customer selects to keep. ( I read this will kill off perennials if it's covered with barrier and mulch but have never done it, always removed everything before laying barrier. My concern is how thickly spread the vegetation in these beds are. Does anyone have experience with this?)

> Lay and pin barrier in the beds. Or wet newspaper. Top with mulch. ( I never used newspaper either but I heard it's great for killing weeds. It's probably unorthodox to offer it to a customer and might get chewed out a bit here but it will cut cost as well. Could use feedback on this.)


My guess is some people might say RUN from this one and normally we would turn this one down. But we have gaps in the schedule and I'd like to keep this customer. I'd like to know what some other LCOs would propose they do. Thanks for reading, I appreciate any feedback.
Attached Images
               
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-06-2014, 07:52 PM
CND23 CND23 is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Schenectady, NY
Posts: 8
Remaining pictures
Attached Images
           
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-06-2014, 09:05 PM
windflower windflower is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: wilmington nc
Posts: 693
Looks like a hand weeding job to me. Unless there are more areas not shown it shouldn't take more than half a day. Clean it up and put out a pre emergent.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-06-2014, 09:07 PM
Ditta&Sons's Avatar
Ditta&Sons Ditta&Sons is online now
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Niagara Falls, Ontario
Posts: 506
whats the real problem here? they want weeding and mulch. pull weeds, define and edge where there isnt one and bring in mulch. theres an entire bed that you cant mulch until late fall or very early spring, its chock-full of plant material, if you get the job started now, you can work on this area later. bring the edge out several inches away from where it appears to be, and this way, the client sees more mulch and is happy with paying you what youre charging them for mulch. And remove all those misplaced rocks LOL what are they there for?
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-06-2014, 11:08 PM
CND23 CND23 is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Schenectady, NY
Posts: 8
It may seem like were overthinking it. But if it were text book we would just knock it out. Even if we weeded theirs still no space for mulch, 90% of the beds are Lilies and hostas. Were definitely going to clean these beds up it's a matter of how we do it utilizing time wisely. Normally we would pull up what needs to go in order to prep the ground and mulch, in this case it would take far to long. Like you said Ditta, it's not the right time to mulch, all these beds are in the same condition as the side bed I think you referred too. And that's what I would normally tell a new prospect. I'd rather not lose this one to some operation that will blitz in here and make a mess for next year, chances are I'd get the call to clean it up. Thanks for your feedback guys.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-06-2014, 11:17 PM
rockycrab's Avatar
rockycrab rockycrab is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: clackamas, oregon
Posts: 153
Do them a favor and suggest they quit torturing their plant material. Flush cut everything to the ground, pre-merge and bark it!
__________________
USMC 1stMarDiv 0311 OohRaH!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-07-2014, 06:04 PM
ed2hess's Avatar
ed2hess ed2hess is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Austin Texas 78727
Posts: 11,492
The condition of the house and fence doesn't give much hope for getting a big job. I would ask them how much they are thinking about spending. Not any need for mulch just weeding.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-07-2014, 08:06 PM
cotyledon cotyledon is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: yaphank ny
Posts: 171
Plant the seed for all new planting
Posted via Mobile Device
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-07-2014, 08:22 PM
CND23 CND23 is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Schenectady, NY
Posts: 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by ed2hess View Post
The condition of the house and fence doesn't give much hope for getting a big job. I would ask them how much they are thinking about spending. Not any need for mulch just weeding.
Just what I had thought. What's the logic in hiring someone to make these beds presentable if this is how they are maintained. It's just an unusual situation. I'm going to consult with them tomorrow and then we can move on.. I don't want to bring up any expensive options because of the condition of this residence. What I will propose are some things discussed here, thanks for everyones input.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-07-2014, 08:45 PM
RichardC RichardC is online now
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: NH
Posts: 88
To me it's pretty simple.. I just ask the customer what they want/expect. Do you want everything removed? Or are there certain ones you want to keep/remove?

Figure out what exactly they'd like done, and give them the price.. if it's more than they want to pay, either dont take the job, or make a few suggestions on things you could not do, to reduce the cost.

I have a customer with perennial gardens that overgrow each year. i add a maint. day a couple times a month for her, in addition to the lawn mowing i already do there. aside from the initial cleanup in the spring which takes about 6 hours, i spend about an hour each maint day weeding, pulling out perennials that stray away from their designated spot, etc. makes the job easier for me, and keeps it looking fresh for her all season long.

maybe you could use this opportunity to get your customer onto a regular maint. schedule so this doesnt happen again..
__________________
Richard
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.comô - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:59 AM.

Page generated in 0.13735 seconds with 10 queries