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  #1  
Old 07-09-2014, 03:26 PM
grassmasterswilson grassmasterswilson is offline
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Plants die from too much water and not enough

Over the last 2-3 years I have tried to redo my landscape. I got a local nursery to design and install it after my own failed attempt. I am continually replacing plants from lack or too much water.

Currently I've got some azaleas and arborvitae that are turning brown. I've run my sprinklers every other day to keep the soil moist and get them established. I stuck my finger down the root ball and the soil is really moist. Since this just started I'm guessing too much water.

On the other hand I've got some hydrangeas I can't keep enough water too. I know they require a lot of water especially in the heat but my irrigation isn't providing enough water.

Last year I stuck to hand watering each plant but seemed to wait til the started wilting a little before watering. I was really busy and it took a back seat.

So I'm having a tough time as you can see. I'm not going to proceed with one bed section at a time. Maybe install a soaker hoes and try to get them established before moving on. Divide and concur.

I wonder if there is a reliable water tester I could stick in the ground to keep an eye on the moisture so I didn't over water.
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Old 07-09-2014, 03:34 PM
Mark Oomkes Mark Oomkes is offline
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Azaleas don't need much water.

Arbs need a lot, in their native habitat, they grow in swamps.
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Old 07-09-2014, 04:39 PM
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Unless you know what the ph for your landscape was in advance of planting I believe this issue more than anything else can surely destroy the best landscapes very quickly. Did you have a soil ph test in advance of either landscape attempts?. If so and the soil ph was fine for what your planting you may have other issues. If no soil test was done nothing will make a difference for now and the future.
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Old 07-09-2014, 04:50 PM
RussellB RussellB is offline
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I would check for leaf hoppers or other plant eating pests. Shake to plants and see what flies out. Look at the under sides of the leaves to see what is hanging out. Look for white cob web type stuff along the stems of the plants. I'd bet you have a bug problem.
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Old 07-09-2014, 07:35 PM
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andersman02 andersman02 is offline
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If your hydrangeas are mop heads and get any decent sun... they will wilt midday NO MATTER WHAT. Sounds like your over watering most of the stuff. If one dies, pull it out and take a look at the roots, they should be white or cream color... Brown and black with a squishy texture means over water and most likely root rot.

If the design was any of a low maintenance design. You shouldn't have to water or fertilize... already that's how I design. If a shady plant was planted in a sunny place, it will likely burn and need extra watering attention
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Old 07-09-2014, 07:38 PM
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We never check ph as most out soils here are pretty neutral. If you have had problems growing plants or grass in the past on this area, maybe it's time for that.

When we plant, we typically backfill with nice topsoil mixed with some native soil
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Old 07-10-2014, 06:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andersman02 View Post
We never check ph as most out soils here are pretty neutral. If you have had problems growing plants or grass in the past on this area, maybe it's time for that.

When we plant, we typically backfill with nice topsoil mixed with some native soil
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You think it might be a little to late to check the soil ph now for anything to grow in the future?. Other than replacing the entire landscape for a 3rd time which I am sure the OP can't wait to do, how would checking the ph now possible help the problem?.
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Old 07-10-2014, 09:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by easy-lift guy View Post
You think it might be a little to late to check the soil ph now for anything to grow in the future?. Other than replacing the entire landscape for a 3rd time which I am sure the OP can't wait to do, how would checking the ph now possible help the problem?.
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I'm saying if nothing is growing well, check the ph before ripping all they plants that are still alive out. Why rip out everything that may possibly still be living just to check the ph....
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Old 07-10-2014, 09:16 AM
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andersman02 andersman02 is offline
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Remember this to, you WILL kill a plant faster by over watering it compared to under watering
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Old 07-10-2014, 10:39 AM
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Originally Posted by andersman02 View Post
I'm saying if nothing is growing well, check the ph before ripping all they plants that are still alive out. Why rip out everything that may possibly still be living just to check the ph....
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The ph is absolutely critical for anything to grow. Unless the ph is correct for the entire landscape based on types of plant material and other factors, odds are against the OP or anyone else having a successful outcome for their landscapes.

Basic knowledge of agronomy and soil management are keys to successful landscape from the roots up. When the ph is to high or two low the results are usually disastrous and expensive to fix after the fact.
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