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  #1  
Old 02-17-2015, 10:26 PM
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94gt331 94gt331 is offline
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Osha compliance for 2015 and small business

Hey guys never really had a saftly program in place other than my crew understanding our equiptment and having first aid kits in the trucks. I got a call from a outside agency today that helps company's get compliant etc. He told me for $1338 he could make sure our company gets osha compliant. Is this a scam or can I look into this myself. He deffinatly got me thinking about the importance of a saftly program for my crew especially since we have been growing. I never really thought Osha was a thing for small landscape company's but it got me thinking it is important to be safe. Can anyone here help shed some light or give me advice about what laws or guidelines a guy like me needs to follow or be aware of. My crew consists of myself and four guys and 3 trucks. So we are just a small outfit. Thanks.
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  #2  
Old 02-18-2015, 08:49 AM
Kawizx62003 Kawizx62003 is offline
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I will tell you this. I posted a simialer question a few days ago. The only responses I got were not based on fact. It seems most/many? on here think they dont have to be OSHA compliant. There seems to be a myth that under 10 employees you are exempt from OSHA. I disagree. There are some exemptions for businesses that small but it is not "exempt from having a safe work place".

Now, I would imagine they are trying to scare you into paying them to do something you can do. If you search my recent threads, I posted a link for a OSHA manual. Seems easy to understand. I plan to contact OSHA aand my state directly to find out exactly what I need to do. Also it seems having less than 10 employees you are exempt from keeping injury records and are exempt from safety inspections. But you STILL need to be compliant...1 worker or 100. This is from my research. That means find out for yourself cause I am only going off my limited research.

My thread did not get many responses so I doubt yours will either. So that leads me to believe people on here with employees a)dont think it appllies to them b) OSHA wont mess with them or c) dont care about me and my buinsess haha.

The point: Comply but dont pay for it.
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  #3  
Old 02-18-2015, 08:53 AM
Kawizx62003 Kawizx62003 is offline
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Here. This thread has the link . It may be out of date (i am not sure if there has been a newer version). But most probabaly still applies.

http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=436444
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  #4  
Old 02-20-2015, 11:54 AM
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TPendagast TPendagast is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kawizx62003 View Post
I will tell you this. I posted a simialer question a few days ago. The only responses I got were not based on fact. It seems most/many? on here think they dont have to be OSHA compliant. There seems to be a myth that under 10 employees you are exempt from OSHA. I disagree. There are some exemptions for businesses that small but it is not "exempt from having a safe work place".

Now, I would imagine they are trying to scare you into paying them to do something you can do. If you search my recent threads, I posted a link for a OSHA manual. Seems easy to understand. I plan to contact OSHA aand my state directly to find out exactly what I need to do. Also it seems having less than 10 employees you are exempt from keeping injury records and are exempt from safety inspections. But you STILL need to be compliant...1 worker or 100. This is from my research. That means find out for yourself cause I am only going off my limited research.

My thread did not get many responses so I doubt yours will either. So that leads me to believe people on here with employees a)dont think it appllies to them b) OSHA wont mess with them or c) dont care about me and my buinsess haha.

The point: Comply but dont pay for it.
On your other thread, I supplied you with FACT and a link to the actual government website to find more fact, and a direct link to the below 10 employee law.

I also annotated that like federal minimum wage and employment laws, the federal standard is the minimum law and certain states are authorized to (and some do) enforce their own, more restrictive laws.
But the federal standard is indeed 10…it's not a myth, or an opinion.

I live in Alaska, which with the exception of North Dakota right now, is the most federally regulated state when it comes to safety.

I have all the silly cards and certs from NTSC to TWIC to etc etc etc.
Been to the classes, read the propaganda and listened to all the blah blah blah.

when I started in the construction field/trade/industry before it was even KNOWN as "the Green Industry" I endured the silly falsely believed "OSHA" regulations, like steel toe boots, long pants in some cases long sleeves.
None of which are either required or necessary.

Human nature is to over do something in order to be "safe".
Ex: army regulation boot black… the boots needed to have enough 'boot black' on them to make sure the boots did not deteriorate and the soldier was taking care of his government issued property.
This evolved into "spit shine" so far and above the actual required army reg, that no one really knew why everyone was spit shining combat boots daily, in the first place.
A similar army reg developed into starching combat dress uniforms.
The same "way" over doing it behavior, that became understood to be "the minimum" when it was never a requirement at all.
The same human behavior that makes americans buy dually 1 ton trucks to grab groceries and tow their aluminum bass boat three times a year,

Silliness.

So silly the army got rid of black boots all together and changed their uniform regs once someone with a brain realized soldiers were spending over 15% of their pay on "modifying" their uniforms to meet an imaginary reg.

Similar things have existed in the OSHA department, because people don't want to read, or when they do they fail to understand government regulation in text (this also occurred quite regularly with hunting/fishing regs)
People don't want to read them, people want to be told, so everything goes on spoken rumor, started by someone who was asked and wanted to "be on the safe side".

OSHA regulations aren't about safe worksites, they are about workers rights TO a safe work place.
the investigation into, and over sight of those rights, to assure compliance, begins at TEN employees, are you aren;t going to find OSHA reps floating around your company unless to have 30-40 employees or more, and even THEN it's super rare unless you have a few reportable incidents.

WHEN you get over a certain size company, you need posted signs, and fire extinguishers and eye wash stations, LABELED first aid kits (official ones not a box of bandaids)
WHEN you get to a LARGER sized company you will need an actual employee designated as a "safety compliance officer" who will receive training, and file reports.
THEN when you get to an even larger sized company, you will need that employee to do that FULL time, and do nothing else.

None of that, however, applies to a landscape company starting out with it's first few employees.
It's like that, by design, on purpose… so that when the employer starts bringing on more and more employees, the regulations for ensuring employees rights are upheld, increase as the company size increases.

Do you honestly believe you are required to supply both a male and female restroom facility at your work sites (must have separate facilities, irregardless of wether you have any females ON the payroll)
OR maybe that OSHA Reg doesn't apply to YOU at your company size?

Maybe Ive been through this…. once or twice and y'know…. have actually, heard, read and been taught (by the government) the facts.
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  #5  
Old 02-20-2015, 12:05 PM
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TPendagast TPendagast is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 94gt331 View Post
Hey guys never really had a saftly program in place other than my crew understanding our equiptment and having first aid kits in the trucks. I got a call from a outside agency today that helps company's get compliant etc. He told me for $1338 he could make sure our company gets osha compliant. Is this a scam or can I look into this myself. He deffinatly got me thinking about the importance of a saftly program for my crew especially since we have been growing. I never really thought Osha was a thing for small landscape company's but it got me thinking it is important to be safe. Can anyone here help shed some light or give me advice about what laws or guidelines a guy like me needs to follow or be aware of. My crew consists of myself and four guys and 3 trucks. So we are just a small outfit. Thanks.
You have four guys, there isn't anything specific you are required to do at your company size that you cannot do yourself.

A quick google search will get you to the official government website where you can find all the FREE information you want.
The placards, signs, and information on what and where they need to be hung is ALL FREE, supplied by the government.

If you have more than ten employees, you are required to report work related injuries.
Example….. your employees are waiting outside before work, they haven't even clocked in yet, a bee stings one of the employees, they have al allergic reaction, they have to go to the hospital.
You have to report that (EVEN tho the employee wasn't clocked in, they were on com pay grounds)
it's a bee sting, nothing big, BUT the person had to go to the hospital.

that requirement beings at 10 employees.

you don't have to report that if you have LESS than 10.

Read the government website, it's pretty simple and will even mention scam artists trying to get you to pay to become "compliant"
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  #6  
Old 02-20-2015, 12:22 PM
Kawizx62003 Kawizx62003 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TPendagast View Post
On your other thread, I supplied you with FACT and a link to the actual government website to find more fact, and a direct link to the below 10 employee law.

I also annotated that like federal minimum wage and employment laws, the federal standard is the minimum law and certain states are authorized to (and some do) enforce their own, more restrictive laws.
But the federal standard is indeed 10…it's not a myth, or an opinion.

I live in Alaska, which with the exception of North Dakota right now, is the most federally regulated state when it comes to safety.

I have all the silly cards and certs from NTSC to TWIC to etc etc etc.
Been to the classes, read the propaganda and listened to all the blah blah blah.

when I started in the construction field/trade/industry before it was even KNOWN as "the Green Industry" I endured the silly falsely believed "OSHA" regulations, like steel toe boots, long pants in some cases long sleeves.
None of which are either required or necessary.

Human nature is to over do something in order to be "safe".
Ex: army regulation boot black… the boots needed to have enough 'boot black' on them to make sure the boots did not deteriorate and the soldier was taking care of his government issued property.
This evolved into "spit shine" so far and above the actual required army reg, that no one really knew why everyone was spit shining combat boots daily, in the first place.
A similar army reg developed into starching combat dress uniforms.
The same "way" over doing it behavior, that became understood to be "the minimum" when it was never a requirement at all.
The same human behavior that makes americans buy dually 1 ton trucks to grab groceries and tow their aluminum bass boat three times a year,

Silliness.

So silly the army got rid of black boots all together and changed their uniform regs once someone with a brain realized soldiers were spending over 15% of their pay on "modifying" their uniforms to meet an imaginary reg.

Similar things have existed in the OSHA department, because people don't want to read, or when they do they fail to understand government regulation in text (this also occurred quite regularly with hunting/fishing regs)
People don't want to read them, people want to be told, so everything goes on spoken rumor, started by someone who was asked and wanted to "be on the safe side".

OSHA regulations aren't about safe worksites, they are about workers rights TO a safe work place.
the investigation into, and over sight of those rights, to assure compliance, begins at TEN employees, are you aren;t going to find OSHA reps floating around your company unless to have 30-40 employees or more, and even THEN it's super rare unless you have a few reportable incidents.

WHEN you get over a certain size company, you need posted signs, and fire extinguishers and eye wash stations, LABELED first aid kits (official ones not a box of bandaids)
WHEN you get to a LARGER sized company you will need an actual employee designated as a "safety compliance officer" who will receive training, and file reports.
THEN when you get to an even larger sized company, you will need that employee to do that FULL time, and do nothing else.

None of that, however, applies to a landscape company starting out with it's first few employees.
It's like that, by design, on purpose… so that when the employer starts bringing on more and more employees, the regulations for ensuring employees rights are upheld, increase as the company size increases.

Do you honestly believe you are required to supply both a male and female restroom facility at your work sites (must have separate facilities, irregardless of wether you have any females ON the payroll)
OR maybe that OSHA Reg doesn't apply to YOU at your company size?

Maybe Ive been through this…. once or twice and y'know…. have actually, heard, read and been taught (by the government) the facts.
The link and 10 empployee reference is ONLY for reporting INJURIES and keeping logs of injuries and major illness. IT DOES NOT MEAN YOU CAN HAVE AN UNSAFE WORK PLACE IF YOU HAVE LESS THAN 1O EMPLOYEES.

I didnt ask, specifically, about injury and illness reporting. I asked about OSHA compliance in general.

I am calling OSHA now for facts.
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  #7  
Old 02-20-2015, 12:35 PM
Kawizx62003 Kawizx62003 is offline
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Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: somwhere in the middle
Posts: 1,701
Quote:
Originally Posted by TPendagast View Post
On your other thread, I supplied you with FACT and a link to the actual government website to find more fact, and a direct link to the below 10 employee law.

I also annotated that like federal minimum wage and employment laws, the federal standard is the minimum law and certain states are authorized to (and some do) enforce their own, more restrictive laws.
But the federal standard is indeed 10…it's not a myth, or an opinion.

I live in Alaska, which with the exception of North Dakota right now, is the most federally regulated state when it comes to safety.

I have all the silly cards and certs from NTSC to TWIC to etc etc etc.
Been to the classes, read the propaganda and listened to all the blah blah blah.

when I started in the construction field/trade/industry before it was even KNOWN as "the Green Industry" I endured the silly falsely believed "OSHA" regulations, like steel toe boots, long pants in some cases long sleeves.
None of which are either required or necessary.

Human nature is to over do something in order to be "safe".
Ex: army regulation boot black… the boots needed to have enough 'boot black' on them to make sure the boots did not deteriorate and the soldier was taking care of his government issued property.
This evolved into "spit shine" so far and above the actual required army reg, that no one really knew why everyone was spit shining combat boots daily, in the first place.
A similar army reg developed into starching combat dress uniforms.
The same "way" over doing it behavior, that became understood to be "the minimum" when it was never a requirement at all.
The same human behavior that makes americans buy dually 1 ton trucks to grab groceries and tow their aluminum bass boat three times a year,

Silliness.

So silly the army got rid of black boots all together and changed their uniform regs once someone with a brain realized soldiers were spending over 15% of their pay on "modifying" their uniforms to meet an imaginary reg.

Similar things have existed in the OSHA department, because people don't want to read, or when they do they fail to understand government regulation in text (this also occurred quite regularly with hunting/fishing regs)
People don't want to read them, people want to be told, so everything goes on spoken rumor, started by someone who was asked and wanted to "be on the safe side".

OSHA regulations aren't about safe worksites, they are about workers rights TO a safe work place.
the investigation into, and over sight of those rights, to assure compliance, begins at TEN employees, are you aren;t going to find OSHA reps floating around your company unless to have 30-40 employees or more, and even THEN it's super rare unless you have a few reportable incidents.

WHEN you get over a certain size company, you need posted signs, and fire extinguishers and eye wash stations, LABELED first aid kits (official ones not a box of bandaids)
WHEN you get to a LARGER sized company you will need an actual employee designated as a "safety compliance officer" who will receive training, and file reports.
THEN when you get to an even larger sized company, you will need that employee to do that FULL time, and do nothing else.

None of that, however, applies to a landscape company starting out with it's first few employees.
It's like that, by design, on purpose… so that when the employer starts bringing on more and more employees, the regulations for ensuring employees rights are upheld, increase as the company size increases.

Do you honestly believe you are required to supply both a male and female restroom facility at your work sites (must have separate facilities, irregardless of wether you have any females ON the payroll)
OR maybe that OSHA Reg doesn't apply to YOU at your company size?

Maybe Ive been through this…. once or twice and y'know…. have actually, heard, read and been taught (by the government) the facts.
You need to look at this. Do you really think you dont have to let your 1 employee know the hazards of round up?
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  #8  
Old 02-20-2015, 01:06 PM
Kawizx62003 Kawizx62003 is offline
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Posts: 1,701
Quote:
Originally Posted by TPendagast View Post

Do you honestly believe you are required to supply both a male and female restroom facility at your work sites (must have separate facilities, irregardless of wether you have any females ON the payroll)
OR maybe that OSHA Reg doesn't apply to YOU at your company size?
You are spewing bad information.



First of all, most on here, are operating mobile crews. So to comply with OSHA all they have to have is immediate transportation to a pooper available.

If I hire a female to answer phones from the office, I have to provide her a restroom. As long as it is not designed to be used by more than one person at a time, can be locked from the inside, and has at least one toilet...it can be for both sexes.

SO, do you really think if I had 7 females working in my office doing sales calls all for me and my helper to do the work, I do not have to provide a restroom? Or do you think they would call OSHA and complain and then OSHA says sorry we cant help, there are only 8 employes at "Kawizx62003 Lawn Mowing"?
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  #9  
Old 02-20-2015, 01:24 PM
Kawizx62003 Kawizx62003 is offline
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Just got off the phone with OSHA. Im right. Whether 2 employees or 100, you must comply. The smaller you are, the less your on their radar (obviously, I think). You will only get noticed if there is a serious injury or complaint, usually.

RoundUp for employees, yup better have some MSDS sheets available....
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  #10  
Old 02-20-2015, 05:42 PM
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TPendagast TPendagast is offline
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Location: Wasilla, AK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kawizx62003 View Post
Just got off the phone with OSHA. Im right. Whether 2 employees or 100, you must comply. The smaller you are, the less your on their radar (obviously, I think). You will only get noticed if there is a serious injury or complaint, usually.

RoundUp for employees, yup better have some MSDS sheets available....


ooooooook, who was it on the phone? Their $9/hr receptionist? That person isn't authorized to answer your question in any different way than it was answered to you. They aren't there to interpret posted documents.

Comply with what?

There are different echelons , depending on company size, always has been, always will be...the main reason for that is their ability to detect and enforce, most companies with fewer than 10 employees are out of business so often, OSHA couldn't push paper work fast enough TO enforce anything.

which is why they have different levels of compliance necessary,
They aren't going to expect you to hang signs in your house about OSHA rules when you meet your two guys in your back yard every morning to go out and mow.

You are spewing unnecessary complications about getting started in an extremely small business with very few employees.
Things get far more complicated the larger you are, and it is that way BY DESIGN.

You keep going on with your over complicated stuff and come back in ten years and tell us all about how this affected your amazing success.
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