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Old 09-11-2014, 03:51 PM
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Preventing patina on brass and copper?

Even though we try to "hide" fixtures, recently I've had a couple clients who wanted their fixtures to stay shiny-new. Does anyone know of a spray that would prevent patina on brass and copper?
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Old 09-11-2014, 03:55 PM
larryinalabama larryinalabama is online now
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This
http://www.duplicolor.com/products/adhesionPromoter/
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Old 09-11-2014, 04:05 PM
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Go to a paint store and ask if any clear coat or polyurethane could work for your challenge. Personally I believe your customers request are unreasonable since the normal breakdown of either copper or brass is to corrode.
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Old 09-11-2014, 04:08 PM
rlitman rlitman is offline
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The traditional method of treating brass is lacquer. That's not going to work outdoors though.
Spray polyurethane is a good choice, but you must use "spar" urethane, because that has the UV inhibitors that allow it to be used outside without breaking down. I'd still only expect 3-5 years before it is badly chalked. 10-15 if you use a car type clearcoat (this is a 2-part paint that requires special breathing gear to spray because it is so toxic when wet).
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Old 09-11-2014, 04:11 PM
larryinalabama larryinalabama is online now
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Lets try again.

This
http://www.eastwood.com/bulldog-adhe...-etpo123b.html

Followed by this
http://www.eastwood.com/eastwood-s-2...oss-clear.html

Its extremely hard too get paint too stick to something like shiney Brass or Chrome. If it already has a coat of something I would NOT mess with it.
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Old 09-11-2014, 04:23 PM
rlitman rlitman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by larryinalabama View Post
Its extremely hard too get paint too stick to something like shiney Brass or Chrome.
It's not that bad. The brass must be super clean though. Wipe with a clean paper towel, then another soaked in mineral spirits to remove any residual oils.
Do NOT touch the metal with your bare skin after that or you will have permanent fingerprints.

I used to restore antique brass parts (chandeliers etc). You'd polish them to a mirror shine, and slowly dip in water thin lacquer. Very thin, slowly in, and slowly out so you don't get bubbles. Spray works fine, but you need to be careful not to overapply or you get drips and runs.
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Old 09-11-2014, 04:27 PM
larryinalabama larryinalabama is online now
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Dipping is out of my league.
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Old 09-11-2014, 04:33 PM
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Look at CAST's site under the articles section. Steve did a write up on this subject. You can slow the patina process but not stop it entirely. Everything ages in the outdoor environment.
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Old 09-11-2014, 04:46 PM
rlitman rlitman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by larryinalabama View Post
Dipping is out of my league.
It's really not that difficult, but only works well on small parts. Get it thinned just right and you don't end up with the rippled surface you get from spraying. And the final results are museum quality (though if the humidity was too high, or the phase of the moon was not right, it'd end up hazing, and I'd have to strip it and do over).
BUT, again, I don't think this is going to work outdoors.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Classic Lighting View Post
Look at CAST's site under the articles section. Steve did a write up on this subject. You can slow the patina process but not stop it entirely. Everything ages in the outdoor environment.
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I looked at the CAST site, and found these two links:
http://www.cast-lighting.com/learnin...ronze-Coloring
and
http://www.cast-lighting.com/learnin...ighting-bronze

Is that what you were talking about?

I agree, shiny copper outdoors is NOT something that will last for long.
I've seen vacuum deposited treatments on brass (mostly used on doorknobs and handlesets, but also on bathroom fixtures) that are indeed good answers to this problem, but are in no way DIY. I also know of no plating shops that apply this type of treatment for hire on a small scale.

Plating is an idea. You'd have to talk to a plating shop about what is most corrosion resistant. Probably some layers of nickel cobalt and gold. Going to run you a good few bucks per square inch though. Brush plating is an option for bigger parts, but while pure gold (that's what is deposited with brush plating) will not oxidize (so it is highly weather resistant), it is not at all abrasion resistant, so where it wears through, it will pit. Now if you plated over something that IS wear resistant, like chrome, you could expect long lasting results. That can get a brassy color, but not copper.

Anything with a clear coating is going to weather. As I said, the best clearcoats money can buy are used on cars. This will outlast anything that comes in an aerosol can by at least 3:1.
You might be able to take some samples to a body shop, and have them hit with clearcoat when they're spraying a bigger job.

Last edited by rlitman; 09-11-2014 at 04:54 PM.
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Old 09-11-2014, 04:57 PM
larryinalabama larryinalabama is online now
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The Eastwood Product is the same as mixing your own clear, once you start its good for 48 hours.

http://www.eastwood.com/eastwood-s-2...oss-clear.html
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