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Old 04-01-2003, 10:20 PM
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Shady Brook Shady Brook is offline
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Killing mulberry trees?

What is the best way, time, and means to completly kill mulberry bushes? I have a bazillion through out many lawns that I cut down every year only to have them leap to greater heights. Help me to slay these beasts!

Thanks
Jay
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Old 04-01-2003, 10:38 PM
GroundKprs GroundKprs is offline
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He he, mulberries. Don't know of any other plant that will try to survive so vigorously. Cut down a mulberry tree, stack the logs, and up to 6 months later the logs will sprout. LOL. Pull out a new mulberry sprout just 3" high, and you can get up to a 6-10" root.

Are these growing in the lawn, or along borders like fences?

In my experience, the best woody plant control is triclopyr.
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Old 04-01-2003, 11:15 PM
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Shady Brook Shady Brook is offline
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Thanks Jim

They are all growing on property borders, or in bed areas in or near bushes. Maybe I should just market mulberry's, and make an orchard.

Are you serious about them sprouting 6 mo's later, after being cut in sections? That is nuts!

So would you use straight tryclopyr? I have not see that? They sure are a hearty plant!

Thanks
Jay
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Old 04-02-2003, 01:46 AM
GroundKprs GroundKprs is offline
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Mulberries growing in hedges, in shrub beds, and along fence lines are usually pretty well established, and can't be pulled. May have even been cut off for years, so roots are extensive.

The way I treat woody weeds like this is to try to pull the smaller ones - after a really good soaking rain, or even now before ground dries out from winter. If it can't be pulled, but seems small, I use a post hole shove to loosen roots. For bigger ones (especially mulberries, because of deep taproot), I will cut off a little above ground level, then drill a hole (or holes, if very large) into the stump, and apply full strength triclopyr with a large eyedropper. Have nailed mulberries up to 8" in diameter this way.

Ortho used to sell triclopyr as their Brush Killer, but I have only seen it last few years as ready to spray, not in concentrate. Concentrated will be about 8% active ingredient. Last few years I have found Enforcer brand brush killer at Lowes with triclopyr as active ingredient. Most brush killers are just a Roundup and 2,4-D combo - these may work. The key is to get enough pesticide into the plants root system by drilling.

Of course, this is time consuming, but only adds 40-50% to the time to just cut them down. Most clients have cut them themselves for years, and would happily pay the extra to have them gone forever.

And why are the mulberries growing there? The mulberry is such a prolific seeder, and seeds sprout and survive so successfully, the area around a female mulberry (yep, mulberries are dioecious, male trees and female trees) should be covered with new trees. But it's not, because they would be so dense they would choke themselves out in a few years. A mulberry seed has a coating on it that will not allow the seed to germinate. This coating is removed only by passage through a bird's gullet. And consequently, you find mulberries growing where birds tend to sit, under eaves of house, fence lines, under other trees and shrubs, and under power lines. Ain't nature neat?
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Old 04-02-2003, 07:22 AM
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Shady Brook Shady Brook is offline
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Wow Jim, that is awsome info as is the norm with you!

I have an idea.... we can treat the female mulberry plant prior to seed deposition, in a way that makes the seed taste nasty to the birds who would eat the seeds! Yeah, thats the ticket, we could eradicate mulberry plants!

Well, I look forward to trying your suggestions.
Thanks a bunch
Jay
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  #6  
Old 04-02-2003, 07:18 PM
SJH Landscaping SJH Landscaping is offline
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Cut the tree stump and paint on concentrated RoundUp.
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