Register free!
Search
 
     

Click for Weather
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old 02-28-2006, 09:17 AM
Madstriper Madstriper is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Jackson Mississippi
Posts: 131
OK, earlier ya'll said you would keep it 8th grade. Please keep this in mind, I am not an accelerated learner like my daughter!!!
Enjoying this thread though, love to learn more about all this.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 02-28-2006, 09:21 AM
Az Gardener Az Gardener is offline
LawnSite Gold Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Phoenix, Az
Posts: 3,893
While I found this entire thread interesting I do have some more simple questions such as. What difference does it make where the nitrogen is derived from? Also I use bridge products with low amounts of nitrogen through fertilizer injectors on most of my properties. I do this to buffer the salts our water is typically 8.2, and to break up our compacted soils, most is heavy clay. I have noticed that when I supplement the turf with Calcium nitrate the turf really pops, not necessarily in growth but in deep blue green color.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 02-28-2006, 11:12 AM
Ric's Avatar
Ric Ric is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: S W Florida
Posts: 10,822
Quote:
Originally Posted by Az Gardener
While I found this entire thread interesting I do have some more simple questions such as. What difference does it make where the nitrogen is derived from? Also I use bridge products with low amounts of nitrogen through fertilizer injectors on most of my properties. I do this to buffer the salts our water is typically 8.2, and to break up our compacted soils, most is heavy clay. I have noticed that when I supplement the turf with Calcium nitrate the turf really pops, not necessarily in growth but in deep blue green color.
Az Gardener

Very good question and a practical one that I am currently referring to. The source of Nitrogen is important in several ways. One being the way in which it break down to the nitrate forum which all plants can up take. The speed of each will differ and Ammonium Nitrate will be available right now, while Urea formaldehyde with take a while to break down first before up take. Therefore it is important for slow release or quick up take.

Calcium Nitrate in fact gives a deeper darker green than urea and each form of nitrogen there will in fact have a different level of color to the plant. Calcium Nitrate will also give the plant a stronger stalk and make it stand up better. Potassium Nitrate will a slightly lighter green than Calcium Nitrate but better vascular strength and increase root extension.

Many Years ago I saw a picture done by a artist. His canvas was in fact TURF and his paint or medium was Fertilizer. By using different Fertilizer he achieved different colors to create the image of Jesus on a hill side. Each forum of Nitrogen and all fertilizer element have a little different effect on plants and by know that you can better manage those plants whether they be turf plant, trees, annuals or a woody ornamental.

BTW Calcium Nitrate is not only an excellent source of Nitrogen but expensive. Therefore cost factor come into play also. Urea is the cheapest form of Nitrogen and Russia flooded the market several years ago because of their vast amounts of natural gas. Urea is extracted from the air and prilled by use of energy of heat provided by the natural gas. The Russia Urea wasn't in the purest form and had a black color to the crystals. Once mixed into a tank the impurity separated and were caught in the filter. But the Urea was still good and cost me $ 5 a 50 lb bag of 46-0-0.

I am going to stop here because this is one of the subjects of the book I am trying to write but hopefully you get the Idea.
__________________
.

"TG doesn't give a rats ass about being "Responsible" as long as sales/production quotas are met. That's it in a nutshell. A recipe for disaster IMO." Ted Putnam 2/28/14

You can lead a Donkey to water but you can't make the Jackass Drink

"As Americans you have the right to be stupid." John Kerry

"Life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid.” John Wayne.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 02-28-2006, 01:33 PM
lilmarvin4064's Avatar
lilmarvin4064 lilmarvin4064 is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: transition-zone
Posts: 736
I was wondering if anyone could tell me what the difference is between methylenediurea and dimethylenetriurea. I'm guessing that the DMTU takes longer to break down than the MDU. Anyone know?
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 02-28-2006, 02:36 PM
Ric's Avatar
Ric Ric is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: S W Florida
Posts: 10,822
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilmarvin4064
I was wondering if anyone could tell me what the difference is between methylenediurea and dimethylenetriurea. I'm guessing that the DMTU takes longer to break down than the MDU. Anyone know?

Lilmarvin

Dimethy is more of a true slow release than Methy both of which have very low volatilization. Because Urea in General is manufactured from the Atmosphere it is rather unstable once mixed with water. In fact Urea is Hygroscopic and will volatilize in the bag. Get around a tank mix of urea and you smell it. Even bags of Urea give off a smell that is the volatilization of straight Urea. It is losing it's Nitrogen back into the air.
__________________
.

"TG doesn't give a rats ass about being "Responsible" as long as sales/production quotas are met. That's it in a nutshell. A recipe for disaster IMO." Ted Putnam 2/28/14

You can lead a Donkey to water but you can't make the Jackass Drink

"As Americans you have the right to be stupid." John Kerry

"Life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid.” John Wayne.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 02-28-2006, 03:37 PM
fertit fertit is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: 97034
Posts: 36
Ammonium Sulfate for best kick in AZ

Quote:
Originally Posted by Az Gardener
While I found this entire thread interesting I do have some more simple questions such as. What difference does it make where the nitrogen is derived from? Also I use bridge products with low amounts of nitrogen through fertilizer injectors on most of my properties. I do this to buffer the salts our water is typically 8.2, and to break up our compacted soils, most is heavy clay. I have noticed that when I supplement the turf with Calcium nitrate the turf really pops, not necessarily in growth but in deep blue green color.
Hey AZG- Urea is cheap like Ric said, and he's certainly right about CaNO3- you're noticing this fast greenup due to the nitrates in this as well as the calcium- their working much better togther than apart in that pathetic soil and water you have have to deal with. Try Ammonium Sulfate for another quick green as well- Less K and more N, and the Sulfur, well... you'll like it. For a real treat, add some Nutralene to the mix for a longer term residual on the N. Call Wilbur-Ellis in Tempe and they'll set you up.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 02-28-2006, 05:10 PM
Az Gardener Az Gardener is offline
LawnSite Gold Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Phoenix, Az
Posts: 3,893
I have used the sulfate in the past and the turf exploded growth wise but I didn't get the color I get with the calcium nitrate. Also the results were not as long lasting. It may have something to do with the products I use in my injectors, it is a humate base but is also loaded with enzymes so it has a multiplying effect on whatever synthetics I use. The cost is not an issue as all my homes are upper end residential and they don't make any noise about fertilizer costs.
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 02-28-2006, 09:40 PM
Ric's Avatar
Ric Ric is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: S W Florida
Posts: 10,822
Yo guys

I missed saying that certain forms of Nitrogen are more acidifying than others. Acid forming Fertilizer are not good on low pH soils. Therefore Cal nite might be a better choice of Amn sulfate.
__________________
.

"TG doesn't give a rats ass about being "Responsible" as long as sales/production quotas are met. That's it in a nutshell. A recipe for disaster IMO." Ted Putnam 2/28/14

You can lead a Donkey to water but you can't make the Jackass Drink

"As Americans you have the right to be stupid." John Kerry

"Life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid.” John Wayne.
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 03-01-2006, 09:03 AM
fertit fertit is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: 97034
Posts: 36
Low pH not an issue in the desert

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ric
Yo guys

I missed saying that certain forms of Nitrogen are more acidifying than others. Acid forming Fertilizer are not good on low pH soils. Therefore Cal nite might be a better choice of Amn sulfate.
- in soils with low pH. In the desert, high pH and alkaline soils are the rule, with high salts getting added daily when irrigated from the lovely Colorado. Either way, Calcium is an awesome treatment for soils high in sodium, as is sulfur. Pick your poison and go forth!

If $$$ are not a concern for your accounts in AZ, consider a base feed of ureaform at relatively high rates, and used the more soluble forms (calcium nitrate or ammonium sulfate) to 'top-off' the turf color throughout the year. These forms of N have very low salt index and will not add more 'salt to the wound'.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 03-01-2006, 10:14 AM
Ric's Avatar
Ric Ric is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: S W Florida
Posts: 10,822
Quote:
Originally Posted by fertit
- in soils with low pH. In the desert, high pH and alkaline soils are the rule, with high salts getting added daily when irrigated from the lovely Colorado. Either way, Calcium is an awesome treatment for soils high in sodium, as is sulfur. Pick your poison and go forth!

If $$$ are not a concern for your accounts in AZ, consider a base feed of ureaform at relatively high rates, and used the more soluble forms (calcium nitrate or ammonium sulfate) to 'top-off' the turf color throughout the year. These forms of N have very low salt index and will not add more 'salt to the wound'.

Fertit

Sorry I don't read Zip Code so I have no Idea where you are located. Salt Spray and salt water intrusion into ground water is a problem here in coastal Fla as well. Our Calcareous sandy soil runs 9.5 pH so acid forming fertilizers are a must. But don't pass up straight sulfur as a stand alone application. You may be very surprised at the response.
__________________
.

"TG doesn't give a rats ass about being "Responsible" as long as sales/production quotas are met. That's it in a nutshell. A recipe for disaster IMO." Ted Putnam 2/28/14

You can lead a Donkey to water but you can't make the Jackass Drink

"As Americans you have the right to be stupid." John Kerry

"Life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid.” John Wayne.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.com™ - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:35 AM.

Page generated in 0.12987 seconds with 8 queries