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  #11  
Old 09-05-2003, 03:48 PM
Enjoy Life Ronnie's Avatar
Enjoy Life Ronnie Enjoy Life Ronnie is offline
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My grandmother would never let a sprig of grass grow in her yard. Some yards 50 years ago were for flowers and white picket fences only. Oh... and a porch swing. And fireflies. I miss the good old days even realizing that they were mostly in my mind. LOL
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  #12  
Old 09-09-2003, 09:15 AM
woodycrest woodycrest is offline
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SWD,

THanks for the historical information, its interesting that turf management goes back to the 1600s.
Was the bent grass you mentioned used on lawns? It seems bent grass is used almost exclusivley on golf greens nowadays, yet it is considered a weed on a regular lawn.

I wonder how the quality and appearance of the turf at a castle in the 1800s would compare to todays manicured lawns?

Another thing i find interesting is the the use of reel mowers is mostly on golf courses in North America, but in the UK it seems reel mowers use is more widespread. I have done numerous seaches alot of the sites abuot reel mowers are in the UK and they seem to be advertised for the general public. Any idea why they are not used more here? They do require a little more precise maintenance and adjustment than a rotary mower, but i think the actual time spent on adjustments and maintenance is about the same. Although reel sharpening costs alot more than rotary blades.
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  #13  
Old 09-09-2003, 07:30 PM
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dan deutekom dan deutekom is offline
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Ever hit pinecones, sticks or other misc. stuff that lands on american lawns with a reel mower. They are nothing but an expesive pain.
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  #14  
Old 09-10-2003, 08:10 AM
SWD SWD is offline
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Turf back then was a compendium of things. I am aware that croquet and cricket were responsible for important advances in turf. Then, as golf gained in popularity, it to had an impact upon species/varital improvements.
I really can't answer to well how a castle grounds would compare to today's lawns.
My estimation would be probably better.
The reason reel mowers are used in the UK more than here is that rotaries are considered more dangerous/commercial equipment. The turf areas maintained by reel mowers are typically smaller than here in the US. Once a single reel system is set up, the reel should hardly ever require grinding. The bedknife is what requires attention more frequently.
With regards to hitting debris with a reel mower, yep sure have. Even hit a ground hog once.
To return to the organic aspect, a properly set up reel mower is the least stressful on turf. I have seen plently of ground powered reel mowers but not a rotary
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Old 09-10-2003, 08:45 AM
woodycrest woodycrest is offline
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A groundhog???....a live one?? That must have been a mess.

THanks for mentioning about the less stress on the turf, that was actually the point of my post, but i got a little off topic...
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  #16  
Old 09-10-2003, 08:35 PM
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dan deutekom dan deutekom is offline
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That's because a reel mower actually cuts..not chop
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  #17  
Old 09-14-2003, 01:23 AM
Mike Bradbury Mike Bradbury is offline
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Commercial fertilizer

came into being during/after WWII. Ammonium nitrate was an ingredient in explosives and was produced in vast quantites. We know it now as the nitrogen source in fertilizer. It would often be stored in large piles around the grounds of the manufacturing facility. People noticed extreme plant growth around the piles. When the war ended there was much excess A.N around and nothing to do with it. To say nothing of the production facility and all the workers now out of a job. So, noting the plant growth, they gave it away to farmers and other growers to experiment with. Boom, the chemical fertilizer industry was born................
And that is how Timothy McVey wrecked his havoc........
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  #18  
Old 09-14-2003, 10:49 PM
Green in Idaho Green in Idaho is offline
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And most commercial pesticides came into use because of WWI & II due to the extensive research of nerve gas, and other chemical and biological agents.

Aint war great... for advancing civilization?
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  #19  
Old 09-15-2003, 08:23 AM
SWD SWD is offline
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With regards to the last two posts, what are your sources for this information?
Nitrate based fertillizers have been around shortly following Alfred Nobels discovery of collodial materials leading to dynamite. Ammoniun nitrate is not used in the processing of refined, high yield explosives. Slurries, dry/wet shots, low impact - low frequency low explosives for extremely minor displacements is what ammonium nitrates are used for. In it's unrefined, white cyrstallyn state, ammonium nitrate is extremely sensitive.
With regards to the second post, insects are not used at all in empirical tests of NBC material. The respitory system, central nervous system, physical skeleton, all are different. Yes, some NBC material would be effective upon a limited number of pests, yet no where enough for an ancilliary benefit to fund research - base use. One of the largest problems on the battlefield following an NBC event is pest control as most beneficals (birds/rats/some reptiles) are completely removed leaving various orders of insects to hamper decontamination efforts.
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  #20  
Old 09-15-2003, 10:27 AM
Green in Idaho Green in Idaho is offline
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SWD,
Are you doubting the information or just want resources to learn more?
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