Register free!
Search
 
     

Click for Weather
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 10-03-2003, 02:46 AM
Dchall_San_Antonio Dchall_San_Antonio is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 330
Let me see what I can find out about alfalfa bugs killing horses. That sounds like one of those rumors or hoaxes I see all the time.
__________________
David Hall
San Antonio, TX
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 10-03-2003, 03:17 AM
trying 2b organic's Avatar
trying 2b organic trying 2b organic is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: British Columbia Zone 7b
Posts: 567
ok but to be honest i dont care about the horses i just want to know theres no wierd stuff in the alfalfa sold as rabbit food. if it is exacty the same, or at least as safe for turf, as the alfalfa I buy in bags of organic lawn fertilizer. and again, anyone who knows the n-p-k of alfalfa, plz tell me.
__________________
Life shrinks or expands according to ones courage.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 10-03-2003, 10:51 AM
Popsicle's Avatar
Popsicle Popsicle is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Western Washington
Posts: 189
I have a reference that shows alfalfa meal:

2%-3% N
.7% P
2.25% K

Pesticide residues may be present if not organic.
__________________
-Russ
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 10-03-2003, 12:04 PM
Green in Idaho Green in Idaho is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Idaho
Posts: 833
The residue is interesting. Especially for products where the use is the leaf such as alfalfa.

Alfalfa is often dosed with chems at the agricultural level to produce the crop. Particularly for the alfalfa seed growers (popular in my area). After the seed is harvested the rest of the plant is harvested for ______.

Perhaps there are some farmers on here who could elaborate...


Just like the chicken manure and the steer manure, if we look UPSTREAM from the supply there is likely chemical use. To get away from that it would be the "grown organically" at each level and that would be costly.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 10-04-2003, 12:03 PM
Dchall_San_Antonio Dchall_San_Antonio is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 330
Here are three links to find out the NPK of stuff and other things.

http://www.primalseeds.org/npk.htm

http://www.labudde.com/quicklist.htm

http://www.ingredients101.com/wmillfeed.htm
__________________
David Hall
San Antonio, TX
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 10-04-2003, 12:40 PM
yardmonkey yardmonkey is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Norman, Oklahoma
Posts: 337
OK - I'm now remembering that when I went to the feed store to get the alfalfa, they said they had rabbit food and horse food and that both were pure alfalfa pellets. I said I'll take the rabbit food. They threw a bag in the truck, and I started looking at the label. There were about 15 ingredients. So I exchanged it for the horse food, which had a couple of ingredients. I think both were made by Purina.

My friend who owns the local organic store (never quite got off the ground, almost out of business) told me about the bug that kills horses.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 10-05-2003, 10:49 PM
Dchall_San_Antonio Dchall_San_Antonio is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 330
Okay I'm back with more info about the horse-killing bugs. I was wrong and I apologize for doubting you!

There is a beetle called the blister beetle that, when enough are eaten, causes death in horses. And blister beetles are often found in alfalfa crops. Some beetles seem to be tolerated in a crop, but there are ways to avoid keeping the blister beetles that might be in the alfalfa field from showing up in the harvested crop. Here is some further reading on the blister beetle.

http://pearl.agcomm.okstate.edu/plan...ops/f-2072.pdf

The active ingredient in the blister beetle is something called “cantharidin,” (can-THAR-uh-din). This chemical causes blistering of the skin on mammals. In horses and other livestock, large doses of the beetles can cause death. Smaller doses can cause abdominal pain to the point where the horse will act and walk funny. In humans cantharidin has been known since the dawn of medicine as an aphrodisiac. Today we call it Spanish Fly, and it is equally dangerous to us as to horses. And contrary to my junior high gutter education on Spanish Fly, it only works on males, who at the junior high age bracket, hardly need any chemical inducement toward that end. The safer alternative today is called Viagra. Cantharidin is also used to remove warts under a doctor’s supervision. Here is website on cantharidin.

http://www.abvt.org/canth.html

What any of this has to do with alfalfa pellets is still a mystery. So I'm continuing to dig. I need to talk to someone who makes the pellets.
__________________
David Hall
San Antonio, TX
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 10-06-2003, 02:08 PM
trying 2b organic's Avatar
trying 2b organic trying 2b organic is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: British Columbia Zone 7b
Posts: 567
I really appreciate the work and anything u can find out about the production of alfalfa pellets as organic fert. and production for sale as rabbit food. ty
__________________
Life shrinks or expands according to ones courage.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.com™ - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:21 PM.

Page generated in 0.09158 seconds with 7 queries