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  #11  
Old 10-26-2004, 11:26 PM
Tigerotor77W Tigerotor77W is offline
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EngDave, looking forward to four years of miser... err, great, fun, and productive classes! No, seriously, it's a great curriculum and I'm sure I'll love. Also, take a look at the JCB track loaders. There's one about the same size as the Bobcat T190. The CAt 257B is also an alternative (though it will be expensive as well). I have heard the Takeuchi is a beast to maintain (or get to components).

Randy, I'd be interested in hearing how the Bobcat is holding up.
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  #12  
Old 10-27-2004, 11:04 PM
EngDave EngDave is offline
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Xing - Thanks, I've looked at the JCB loader but unfortunately it does not offer a/c so that rules it out. I did like the design though and it appeared that JCB uses a very similar undercarriage as Bobcat. I also demo'd both the Cat 257B and 277B. The T190 is between the two in performance. I liked operating these machines (comfortable cab, pilot controls, etc) but I thought the undercarriage (ASV I think) was very complicated. I just didn't feel comfortable with it's design and my intended use.
An enclosed cab w/heat and a/c is a requirement for me. I'm in the woods a lot and need the protection from yellow jackets and hornets. A couple of weeks ago I hit another yellow jacket nest. I couldn't believe the size of the swarm. I was really glad to have my cab between me and them!
Don't forget to look into your universities co-op or intern program. It might take a little longer to graduate (depends on situation) but it helps break the stress. I'm sure many of the heavy equipment manufacturers have engineering co-op/intern positions that you'd fit perfectly.
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  #13  
Old 10-28-2004, 12:31 AM
Tigerotor77W Tigerotor77W is offline
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Okay, I see. If you're in no rush, give Case and Deere a little time... I'm sure they'll be popping out tracked machines sometime. They won't leave the market alone to Cat and Bobcat (and smaller companies) for too long...

Co-op and intern -- the more I hear "co-op," the more I wish I had gone through and applied to the Cat op-op. I didn't because I wanted to keep the edumacation moving. But I'm probably going to graduate in three years anyhow -- the extra year wouldn't kill me and would free up my summers (so I wouldn't have to do internships during the summer). (By freeing up the summers I could take classes then.) Oh well.
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  #14  
Old 11-18-2004, 12:33 AM
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SouthernYankee SouthernYankee is offline
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engdave question

I am moving from Cape Cod to atlanta and I will primarly be focusing on Bobcat work and landscaping. Cape Cod is a giant sandbox, so I am pretty used to getting stuck in lots of sand when I grade lots. I have never worked in clay before and since all of GA is red clay, I was wondering what you thought about getting tracks over tires set up?

I have a 751 bobcat which I love even though it is on the small side, and I was wondering how those over the tires tracks work in Red clay?

What are the downside of the tracks and I would assume that they would destroy lawns? I have gotten away with going over lawns with my tires and had little problems
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  #15  
Old 11-18-2004, 10:10 PM
EngDave EngDave is offline
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Southern Yankee - Welcome a little bit early to Georgia! Great place to live and make a living. As far as tracks are concerned, it really depends on your type of work. For me, I live in rural Georgia and spend much of my time in planted pine stands, clear cuts, and unimproved land. I also deal with rolling terrain that can hold water and be very slow to dry. All of that said, that's why I run tracks. I have Grouser hard shoes that have been very durable but can be a pain to take on and off. The pros are better traction than tires, more durable than a rubber track, add weight to the bottom of the machine for more tip load, and a cheaper solution than a track machine. The cons are less push than a track machine, require maintenance and cost, and difficult to take on and off.
If you plan to do mostly finish grading and landscaping I doubt tracks would be necessary unless you're dealing with steep lots. I don't take mine over a customer's finished yards or improved surfaces without boards.
The soil conditions can vary quite a bit in the Atlanta area. You're right that it is mostly clay but it can have significant granite rock. If you've seen Stone Mountain you'll understand. The clay is very hard when dry and sticky, slippery, and mushy when wet. Other than tracks I would definitely recommend a toothed bucket and a cheap hoe (I use a simple stiff arm hoe, has only bucket curl, no articulation). The rental stores will generally have most everything else if you need. Your 751 should work fine and you'll find good support for Bobcat in the area. If you do decide to buy tracks make sure to frequently inspect your drive chains and sprockets for wear. The extra weight can be tough on the chain case internals. Good luck.
Dave
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  #16  
Old 11-22-2004, 03:09 AM
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SouthernYankee SouthernYankee is offline
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Hey thanks for the info!!

Are there any sites on the internet that show that attachement. the hoe? thanks for your help. SY
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  #17  
Old 11-22-2004, 06:40 PM
jd270 jd270 is offline
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i used to have a 873 bobcat but the dealer was a pain to deal with it was ok but it had foot controls and the buckets and tires where just too small i have an dj 270 now it is great my dealer is only 2 miles away and serivice is excelent got a heck of a deal on a demo and i love the hand controls plus the engine is wet sleaved just like my tractors i have had no issues with it so far and just got done moving 6000 yrds or dirt on a job with it it is built way heavier than the bobcat and digs like a crawler loader i can out work our 555 deere crawler loader doing certain things we also farm and deere has by far the best parts network by far
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  #18  
Old 11-22-2004, 09:12 PM
EngDave EngDave is offline
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Southern Yankee - I bought the EZ-Backhoe with a 16" bucket from www.skidsteersolutions.com. It cost $2,130 including shipping, a bucket tooth cover, hoses and connectors. I have been very satisfied with it and consider it a required attachment. I bought this one because I liked the gussetting on the boom, very rigid. About the only thing I didn't care for at first was the use of crimp on teeth on the bucket, I prefer pin or bolt on. I've replaced them once, heated them up and peened them on. Much less hassle than I first thought. Check out their site for other details.
This is the fastest way I've found to pull stumps and do shallow excavation. It really takes the wear and tear off my SSL. Bobcat sells a similar hoe that has articulation for about $4,200. It's on the Bobcat website. For me, I didn't want to spend the extra $2k. Also, Bradco and Northern sell their versions.
Dave
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  #19  
Old 11-28-2004, 11:23 PM
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SouthernYankee SouthernYankee is offline
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engdave another question

I really apprciate your help!

My question is how do you build a lawn in atlanta? What I mean is do you spread a topsoil over the red clay or does the grass just grow in that soil?

Up North I would subgrade the lot which would be sand and then spread loam over the subgrade and grade it out. How do yall do it in the south? thanks for the help. SY
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  #20  
Old 11-30-2004, 09:40 PM
EngDave EngDave is offline
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Southern Yankee - I'm probably not the best resource on lawn development but I'm glad to share what I know. Let me say at the outset that the best sources of information are the University of Georgia agricultural research centers (I think that's the name, one's in Griffin, GA the other in Tifton, GA) and the county agricultural extension office. Either of these can provide specific information for the lawn type and location.
The only time I've used top soil is when I've had it on site. I've never brought it in to establish a lawn (I have purchased top soil for gardens however). If I have a drainage/erosion control job that has significant topsoil then I stockpile, complete the cut and fill, then backfill with the topsoil. However, if minimal topsoil exists, then I take soil samples to the county extension office for recommended amendments. As I'm sure you're aware, I'm trying to find the best value solution for my client without sending the budget overboard.
The greater Atlanta area (gets bigger every year, hard to tell when/where the city will stop growing!) seems to include the piedmont, mountain, and coastal plain regions. As such, there are a variety of turf grass species that seem to do well with the correct soil preparation. I've used bermudas, zoysias, and centipede to good success making sure each was used to it's benefits. The local sod farms have cut sheets on each specie they sell, make sure you get them and follow their recommendation as well.
The Atlanta clay based soil tends to be acidic with high iron content (this is a generality, but my experience, use your soil sample to be sure). It can be very slow to percolate. Also the weather can swing from drought to deluge and 100+ degrees in the summer and below zero in the winter. To me, with this variation, it's all the more reason to follow the recommendations provided by the ag extension office.
Hope this helps. I'd be curious what others are doing.
Dave
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