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  #11  
Old 11-30-2004, 02:07 AM
Gravel Rat Gravel Rat is offline
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Location: British Columbia
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More oil you add to the fuel the richer it is less oil means you leaning the fuel out. Your better off with a slightly richer mix than a leaned out mix you have to remember a 2 stroke needs the oil. I know people that run to rich of a oil mix and it does cause problems when I see people running 32 to 1 in a saw that requires 50 to 1 isn't a good idea.

The saw shops I deal with both told me run close to a 50 to 1 mixture like the one shop told me 48 to 1 is good. They also told me run the Stihl oil its all what the fallers and loggers use here in their saws. When a faller makes their lively hood with their chainsaw they use what is proven and what will give the saw the most life. Most fallers do buy a couple saws a year mostly 066 and 046.

As for Amsoil I don't trust it who ever says they can run the fuel mixture at 100 to 1 forget it I'am going to stick with what is proven. I used to make part of my living with my saws doing some thinning and bucking.
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  #12  
Old 11-30-2004, 07:35 AM
Oldtimer Oldtimer is offline
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If you really believe that, then please explain the reason for the adjustment screws on the carb.

Oldtimer
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  #13  
Old 11-30-2004, 01:19 PM
Gravel Rat Gravel Rat is offline
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The oil is lubrication the adjusting screws have nothing todo with the leaness of the fuel if you don't have enough oil to lubricate the cylinder etc the saw will seize up. You lean the oil mixture out in your fuel you really run the risk of burning up the saw in no time flat.

I have seen a brandnew Husky saw someone bought from the local saw shop put the wrong mix into it saw was junk the 2nd day of use.

Myself if Stihl makes oil for their saws why not use it because it meets all their standards and its fairly cheap. Like I said I have been using Stihl oil for a long time never any problems so I'am not going to try anything else.
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  #14  
Old 11-30-2004, 08:21 PM
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Joe B J Joe B J is offline
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Most people refer to lean/rich as fuel/air, not oil/gasoline. I think that is where the confusion came in.
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  #15  
Old 11-30-2004, 10:03 PM
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CGLC CGLC is offline
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what to do now?

Thanks guys for the info. Well, since I followed the advice of that knuckle head should I do anything to my Stihl 420 blower or echo 210 trimmer. They both are brand new this season and have maybe 25- 20 hours on them at the higher gas/oil mixture.
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  #16  
Old 12-01-2004, 08:23 AM
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65hoss 65hoss is offline
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If you use the Stihl oil, do what the bottle says. Not more, not less.

CGLC--next time you mix it, just do what the bottle says.

I run Opti-2 in all 2 cycle motors. I have for around 5 yrs. I mix it at a rate of around 80to1. I run it in all Stihl's, Redmax's, and a lawnboy calling for 32to1. Never a single failure. My business is my life and my equipment is extremely important. I have 1 stihl trimmer with over 3000 hours on it. Still runs strong and every day. Another Stihl trimmer with around 2000 hours on it. Stick edgers, backpack blowers, chainsaws, hedge trimmers, etc that are Redmax or Stihl have been run only on Opti-2 at 80to1 for years. Never one motor failure.
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  #17  
Old 12-01-2004, 09:12 AM
Oldtimer Oldtimer is offline
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Opti-2 mixed @ 100-1 will work just as well. I have read that 90% of the 2 cycle engine problems are fuel related. In the past 2 1/2 months we have sold about 800 chain saws and have had no failures from properly mixed fuel but straight gas and cold seizures have brought a few back for pistons and cylinders.

Cold Seizures are sometimes diagnosed as a lean oil mixture, especially on larger pro saws. It's hard to convince some people that they can't use their saws until they are thoroughly warmed up but after a piston assembly and cylinder they listen better.

Several of our customers use Opti-2 @ 100-1 and this is on saws as large as a MS660. One of the biggest problems we see is the fuel being sold at some of the cut rate gas stations. We only use Amoco or BP 89 octane and for the last 2 years we have used Shindaiwa oil @ 50-1 because Shindaiwa comps a 55 gallon barrel when we order several hundred units at once. For at least 10 years prior to that all of our new equipment was sold with Opti-2 mixed @ 100-1.

We put mixed fuel in everything except diesels. This includes all new 2 and 4 cycle equipment we sell plus all equipment we service. I know that many people have their own opinions about what works best for them but after 22 years in business we have a pretty good idea what will work for everyone. We do not allow any of our empty fuel containers to be taken to the gas station without first adding the correct amount of mix oil to the container. Every fuel container, whether it is in the show room, assembly area or repair area can be used in every piece of equipment except diesels. Special markings are not required because all containers have the same thing in them

We are fortunate not to have oxygenated fuels in Florida so equipment can set for a few months and still start.

Oldtimer
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  #18  
Old 12-01-2004, 09:20 PM
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Joe B J Joe B J is offline
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why would a two cycle engine have to be "thoroughly warmed up" ?
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  #19  
Old 12-01-2004, 10:45 PM
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Mikes Machines Mikes Machines is offline
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Joe, the piston heats up faster than the cylinder. When anything heats up it expands. Most small engines only have about a thousandths and a half of clearance. When the piston grows faster than the cylinder you have metal to metal contact. This is not a good thing. In an extreme case the engine can actually lock up. The clue that this has happened is upon disassembley there will be score marks on the piston at the four corners of the wristpin boss or mount. The score marks will usually be worse on the exhuast side. This is not a fault of the oil, it is improper operation by the owner
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  #20  
Old 12-02-2004, 05:36 AM
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Joe B J Joe B J is offline
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where did you get this information from?
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