100x 50 pond liner

Discussion in 'Water Features' started by STL Ponds and Waterfalls, Jan 11, 2012.

  1. wurkn with amish

    wurkn with amish LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 662

    good luck with this keith and keep us updated. I've never done anything like this before so I'm curious.
     
  2. STL Ponds and Waterfalls

    STL Ponds and Waterfalls LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,177

    Will do Bruce. You better get off the puter and get your salter ready. 1" snow but screwed everything up this morning being so cold all of a sudden.

    Here is a pic of the pond and you can see where the water level usually is located.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. turner_landscaping

    turner_landscaping LawnSite Member
    Posts: 187

    Its called easy weave liner and easy pro produces it. Now its states that you dont need to cover it soil because the strength of the liner is stronger but you do that to balance your pond. Its basically like the xanvan liner that came out several years ago its a woven liner, As to your question about rain runnoff, there are different ways to do one would be to cut the liner into the hillsides and then cover back over the top the of the liner with soil this allows the surface water to go directly into the pond. You will need to install a drain tile under the liner as well as a over flow. The bottom drain would be a hard perforated tile that you would through the berm of the lowest point on the hillside so some escavating is needed if that makes sense to you. The overfill i would simply glue into into the same pipe that is coming from the bottom so that it all goes the same direction.
     
  4. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    Judging from the picture that was posted, a hydrostatic relief valve or drain tiles may not be needed. The pond is obviously on a slope, so there should not be any great water accumulation. Any risk that may occur in a very heavy rainfall will be dictated by the present soil substrate permeability and/or the present depth of the impermeable layer or bedrock.

    If this location is part of the watershed of a nearby public waterway, permitting may or may not be required for the installation of an overflow.
     
  5. LindblomRJ

    LindblomRJ LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,570

    That is my thinking. If you think that a drainage system needs to be in place drail tile running the lengh out the far end with the pipe day lighted out would be my suggestion. Looking at the slope I agree that I don't think any drainage is needed.
     
  6. STL Ponds and Waterfalls

    STL Ponds and Waterfalls LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,177

    I'm missing something with the no drain aspect. There is a lot of runoff going into this pond with 2 downspouts feeding it as well. I look at the drain as cheap insurance.
     
  7. LindblomRJ

    LindblomRJ LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,570

    How far away is the house from the pond? How much water is absorbed by the soil between the house and pond?
     
  8. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    If it will give you peace of mind, then, by all means, install an sub-liner drain.
    All we are saying is that you likely don't need it. Surface run-off does not equate to hydrostatic pressure. In fact, the higher the velocity of run-off, the less likely there will be any hydrostatic pressure. The force exerted by the weight of the water in the pond will prevent any water being forced under the liner by any surface run-off that would be expected on a hillside.
     
  9. LindblomRJ

    LindblomRJ LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,570

    Wouldn't it stand to reason if there was hydrostatic pressure in place, woudn't the pond be sustaining its level? Unless there is a prolonged dry spell.
     
  10. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    Exactly. Though possible, the chance of hydrostatic pressure occurring on a hillside/slope/grade is very slight. Maybe during a '100 year' event', but even then it would depend on the underlying geological formation.
     

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