15 SQ spray head

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by scottt, Mar 28, 2006.

  1. scottt

    scottt LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 269

    I have a 16 x 220 strip and would love to find a way not to have to use all sprays or small rotors. I have never used rb's 15 SQ, their site says 23 x 23 but I don't see it happening with good coverage. The site gets little wind. I don't think the square spray will do it, but I've got to ask. Any opinions?
     
  2. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,412

    They'd probably work, but even with the best of square sprays down the center of a strip, you have around a foot of overspray beyond the sides. In the ancient days of machined brass spray head nozzles, it would have been a 'Square-Undersized' nozzle going in a strip that wide.

    Funny thing - Rainbird had better square nozzles for the 1800 before the ones they offer today. The SQ covered a larger area than the 15SQ, and the SQU was an effective smaller version.

    Even at their best, square nozzles were a pain. You had to locate the sprayhead just right, and orient the nozzle so the square pattern is positioned correctly. If I had to water a 16-foot-wide strip with today's nozzles, run down the center of the strip, I might try 10-foot-radius full circle nozzles spaced head-to-head.
     
  3. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    If not done correctly then you end up with a "diamond" instead of a square? :dancing:
     
  4. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,412

    For something long fallen into obscurity, the old nozzles still work, and the technique was useful when there were beds along the edges of a strip, or a split-rail fence a foot from the border. Also, back then, there weren't the same small-and-efficient nozzles that you can use today. Heads down the middle would probably save a zone, and one extra zone might have meant a significant increase in the cost of the (mechanical, of course) controller used in the system.

    Also, heads down the middle of a strip of lawn near the driveway don't get plowed up after snowstorms.
     
  5. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    Not to mention the galvanized pipe used in these "oldies but goodies" systems. Thank gawd that Marlex screws in quite nicely into galvanized 90s. :laugh:

    Ohh... reminds me that if this type of system were put in then the obligatory diamond-shape grass cutouts around each head would add to the detailing.
     
  6. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,412

    I gunno, brass popup spray bodies and nozzles were used well into the poly pipe days, often with brass saddle tees and poly cutoff risers. No swing joints or funny pipe, though. With only a meager 2 inch popup, they still managed to cover.
     
  7. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    In my area every brass pop-up I've ever come across is securely fastened via a galvanized nipple to galvanized pipe. :cry:
     
  8. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,412

    You were deprived, what can I say? I do remember such systems with fixed (no popup) sprayheads watering dichondra lawns. One thing that the brass sprayheads-on-cutoff-risers ran afoul of, was the 'new breed' of landscaper lawnmowers, with strongly powered wheels, that were capable tearing a head right off the riser.
     
  9. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    LOL... still happens. The dichondra might be gone but the brass heads are still there and still susceptible to mowers. :laugh:
     
  10. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,412

    The lawnmower-damage phenomenon was a head-scratcher at first. Perfectly reliable systems were losing sprayheads for no good reason. The shorter the cutoff riser, the likelier the damage. Took a while to realize the new mowers were doing the damage. Cutoff risers quickly went from a installation convenience to a reliability problem.
     

Share This Page