2 or 4 cycle trimmer

Discussion in 'Mechanic and Repair' started by birddseedd, Mar 15, 2013.

  1. birddseedd

    birddseedd LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,114

    Need to buy a new trimmer. I might get more than just the basic. Thinking echo. I know they ahve 4 cycle. Is this worth getting. being a more complex and slower rpm engine with higher hp, it should be more robust and last longer?
     
  2. GrassGuerilla

    GrassGuerilla LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,437

    Echo 4-stroke? I wasn't aware of Echo making any 4-cycle trimmers. I can attest that their 2-strokes are very good. Likely to last a typical homeowner many years if set up and stored properly. Several good seasons with little to no thought given.
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    Last edited: Mar 15, 2013
  3. birddseedd

    birddseedd LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,114

    yea...............
     
  4. GrassGuerilla

    GrassGuerilla LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,437

    Google returned nothing on echo 4 cycle trimmers.

    For what it's worth, get a 2-stroke echo 225 or 230 or Husqvarna 223, 323, 326, or 327 while you can. $200-300. All of the above will serve you well and are 2-cycles. If you must go 4-cycle look at the Husqvarna with the four stroke Honda motor (at lowes or better yet at a Husky dealer.

    The dealer will set it up properly giving you a much better experience with the tool. Probably the same price + - $20.

    Even if you get it at a box store, it's worth taking it to a dealer for set up for the $20-30. Unless you know how to adjust the carb yourself (in which case I doubt you would be asking).
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  5. birddseedd

    birddseedd LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,114

    maybe the 4 stroke they showed me last year was a husqvarna. im not a fan of them so ill probably stick with echo.

    but in general, would a 4 stroke last longer than a 2 stroke?
     
  6. GrassGuerilla

    GrassGuerilla LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,437

    In terms of a trimmer, in my experience no. Everyone I know who has bought a 4-cycle trimmer has had trouble in a couple years. Some almost immediately. Thus the industry standard is still 2-stroke. Only exception has been the Honda trimmer (heavy and expensive) and the Husqy with the Honda motor.

    From a strictly mechanical perspective 4 stroke should last longer. In practice with engines that are used in multiple positions and orientations, not so much. Two of my neighbors bought Troy bilt four stroke trimmers two years ago. Both bought Echo's last year when the TB's were troublesome. There might be a "good" four stroke trimmer out there, but the pros are using 2-strokes for good reason.
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  7. birddseedd

    birddseedd LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,114

    Thanks for the advice. Ill go ahead and stick with a 2 stroke.
     
  8. dutch1

    dutch1 LawnSite Silver Member
    from Jayhawk
    Posts: 2,231

    Unless there are recent developments that I'm not aware of, I don't believe you will find any Echo trimmers with 4 stroke technology.

    Since the Echo-Shindiawa merger, it's just my opinion that the merged company is going to let the Shindiawa side produce the 4 stroke equipment under the Shindiawa brand until Echo has been assured there are no problems. If you do happen to find a 4 stroke Echo, you can be pretty much assured that it's a Shindiawa with an orange suit.

    I have a Shindiawa T2500 from the first year production, 2001 or 2002, that has not had any problems. The valve problems that have emerged in other 4 stroke equipment has not become a problem--as yet.. I've checked the valve clearance on several occasions--no adjustment needed.

    If you have any chain link or similar fence to trim, the 4 stroke is the way to go--higher torque at lower rpms avoids a lot of line grabbing.

    Just my two cents, for what it's worth. Other opinions may vary.
     
  9. Patriot Services

    Patriot Services LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 12,712

    No echo 4 strokes in the pipeline. As for longevity I attribute that more to maintenance than design. Detroit Diesel used to make 2 stroke diesels for semis. Sounded badazz, smoked a ton, but lasted just as long their 4 stroke counterparts. In other words millions of miles. I have several BR600 4 strokes that get treated well and have had zero issues. Good oil and valve checks make the difference. Its not necessarily more power, but a different power curve and sometimes a weight penalty. To me trimmers are like guns, all will get the job done, but only a few feel truly good in your hands.
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  10. GrassGuerilla

    GrassGuerilla LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,437

    I'd buy the best you can afford within reason. With the EPA tightening regs, the carbs are getting worse and worse. The Husky 223 (or 323 if you want to be able to use a clearing blade). Is about the lightest, most dependable, and powerful trimmer around. At 9 lbs, it's 2 lbs lighter than the Echo, and much more powerful. .9hp for echo 225 vs 1.2 hp for husky 323.

    That said, I just sold an Echo that had been run commercially (and used as a backup) for about 10 years. A little underpowered vs the competition, but dang near bullet proof.

    Good luck with your purchase.
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