23hp missing

Discussion in 'Hustler Turf Equip (Archived)' started by gps_jetskier, Jan 16, 2008.

  1. gps_jetskier

    gps_jetskier LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 303

    Haven't got looking at it yet, but when I start my Kawi23 the motor is only running on one cylinder. After running for a couple minutes slowly but surely the other cylinder begins to fire and eventually comes around and it'll run on both. Any ideas what's going on? It's only got about 200hrs on it I think and it's been serviced regularly. Seems to me if it was a coil going out it'd be the other way around. It would stop working after a bit not start working. The only other thing I can think of is the plug is fouled. I noticed over the summer that it seems to surge slightly while mowing at full throttle. You can only tell though with muffs on. Wonder if the dealer never got the mixure right when he put the Hiperf air filter kit on it the other year.
     
  2. mowerconsultant

    mowerconsultant LawnSite Fanatic
    Male, from Syracuse, NY
    Posts: 9,761

    Sounds like a fouled plug, maybe a coil, maybe a plugged air filter... water in the fuel, plugged fuel filter.... lots of reasons, you need to diagnose it or have a dealer look at it.
    When the dealer installed the remote HD air filter kit they also installed a jet kit, so the mixture is per Kawasaki's specs.
    I would go and get some new plugs and get them installed, pull the air filter and see if it runs different.

    Pj
     
  3. OSDOTF

    OSDOTF LawnSite Member
    Posts: 54

    but the 23hp Kaw on my 20"-wheel Mini Z has had a tendency to load the front plug ever since I got it. It starts with an intermittent popping that initially smooths out when I open the throttle, but it gets progressively worse until I finally change plugs. I remove the choke when it first fires and mow only at full throttle. Our Honda rep once told me that there was an advantage to be gained running 89 (but no higher) octane fuel in Honda G.P. engines. I extrapolated that bit of wisdom over to my Kaw. Since I only buy five gallons of fuel in a poly container, I felt reasonably sure the plug fouling wasn't the result of my operating practices.

    When my engine began popping for the first time last summer, I dumped a half can of "Seafoam" in each tank and topped them off. I imagine I was about a half hour into mowing my lawn when I realized that the occasional miss L'd become so accustomed to hearing was now missing. Shutting off the blades, I throttled back to find a smooth idle -- I was stunned! For the rest of the season, I added "Seafoam" to every second or third tank at the rate of 1 oz per gallon and finished the season on the same set of plugs I'd been ready to pitch earlier in the summer.

    Since then, I've found I can buy "Seafoam" by the can at Speedway almost as cheap as I can stock lt by the case at the store. Give it a try.
     
  4. gps_jetskier

    gps_jetskier LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 303

    Reading posts today and realized I never updated this.

    I wanted to say I took the advice here and when spring brought warm weather here in Michigan I got the mower out and into the garage. I pull the back plug and it was BLACK. Carbon build up around the edges. The front one was considerably better, but not ideal. The gap on both plugs was about .045". Should have been .030".

    Realizing none of it looked right, I headed for the manual. The plugs were not the correct plugs. So off to the store I went for the right plugs which turned out to be 3 plugs hotter I'll add. Mostly likely I wasn't getting good burn. After reinstalling the correct plugs it runs better then it ever has.

    This set of plug only had about 20 hours on them I'd guess. Seems the dealer doesn't realize what plug to put in since they're the only ones that have ever worked on the unit. Sorta disappointed in the dealer these days. That's the second bad taste in my mouth I've had with him.
     
  5. mowerconsultant

    mowerconsultant LawnSite Fanatic
    Male, from Syracuse, NY
    Posts: 9,761

    What plugs were in it? and what did you put in it?
     
  6. gps_jetskier

    gps_jetskier LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 303

    I put whatever Champion cross ref'ed from the NGK listed in my manual. I can't remember the number exactly now, but it was a 14 heat range. It had a Champion 11 range in it.

    Mowed with it last night and it goes great now. I still get a backfire after turning it off though - no matter what throttle position I turn it off at or how long I let it cool down.
     
  7. mowerconsultant

    mowerconsultant LawnSite Fanatic
    Male, from Syracuse, NY
    Posts: 9,761

    The NGK plug is a BPR4ES from the Kawasaki factory.
    The Champion that crosses to it is a RN14YC.
    Heat ranges are backwards between these 2 mfg's low to high vs high to low...
     
  8. gps_jetskier

    gps_jetskier LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 303

    That's the one I used. RN14YC.
    The dealer installed RN11YC I think it was.
     
  9. OSDOTF

    OSDOTF LawnSite Member
    Posts: 54

    The lower the NGK's number, the hotter the plug. A BPR2ES in a water-cooled engine is pretty darn hot while a 10 would be, as we used to say at the motorcycle shop, colder than a banker's stare. Champions go the other way.

    You can get away with subbing a BP4ES for a BPR4ES since the "R" indicates the plug includes a resistor to reduce electrical interference in communication equipment (most engines today also have resistor caps so it's not like your being totally anti-social). DON'T drop the "P" because its presence on original equipment means your engine requires a projected ignition tip. And avoid plugs with a number following a dash at the end of the plug designation such as a BPR5ES-11 (unless you're prepared to re-gap). In this case, "11" indicates the plug has been pre-gapped at 44 thou, and your engine's ignition system just isn't up the task of throwing lightning that far.
     

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