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7 step vs. ipm progr.

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by DAZED AND CONFUSED, Jan 20, 2004.


    DAZED AND CONFUSED LawnSite Member
    Posts: 29

    question to all marketting pros:

    is it cost effective to market both a standard 7 step application and a customized ipm program to you customers or is it easier to market one or the other.
    i have taken new job in a fert company to grow their bottom line how ever most of my exp. comes from hardscaping am looking for ideas to help grow this end of the buis. thanks for your input
  2. Tscape

    Tscape LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,373

    I think that a basic guideline on fertilization is that you want to put down 1 pound of nitrogen per 1000 sq ft. per month of the active growing season. P and K are less uniform in their need vs. availability so we soil test or estimate there. This lends itself to 6 or 7 fertilization applications in many parts of the U.S., but never directly deals with a "pest". Disease and insect problems can be dealt with in the IPM framework. Curative applications are not always the only way to employ a proper IPM philosophy. If the economic threshhold of action is low, you may want to treat areas preventatively.

    Bottom line: Market your 7 step program and custom IPM together as a total program.

    somehow I thought this philosophy might apply here.

    DAZED AND CONFUSED LawnSite Member
    Posts: 29

    to : turfscape

    right now the company includes a blanket spraying for broad leaf and an app of merrit for prev. grub controll is it your opinion that other pest/herb apps be marketed as extra services or would you include this as an added cost to your maintenace program (remeber im only on the property 5 times a year so it is hard to monitor potential problems i guess this is my main concerns of operating an ipm system
  4. Tscape

    Tscape LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,373

    I include pre-emergent in my first app, broadleaf in my second, third and last applications. All other apps include spot spraying for weeds. You have to preach patience to new customers who have broadleaf concerns in their first year, because they did not receive a late fall app with herbicide.

    Grub control, especially with something as costly as Merit, should really be priced seperately. Being that you are on the property 5 times, you can monitor for grub activity, and respond curatively before damage is widespread. Or if a preventative application is wanted or needed, you can be sure to control your profit margin. Merit is a fantastic control for grubs, but I charge double the price of a Dylox application, which is already more than twice the price of a standard fert/herb app. I think clients appreciate that you are really considering their program costs and not just throwing such an expensive application into the program. Their cost concerns are also considered with the 2 options of treatment. This goes a long way toward gaining trust and proving that you are responsible for environmental stewardship.

    DAZED AND CONFUSED LawnSite Member
    Posts: 29

    to: turfscape

    both postings were very informative and helpful. i truely appreciate the advice. thnks very much

    other replys would mean more info so pls post away and again thnks you guys made my first post to lawnsite.com informative
  6. Grassmechanic

    Grassmechanic LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,697

    Depends on what turf type you are targeting and the optimum pounds of N per year that it requires. I think seven steps is overkill for cool season grasses, but if you are only putting 1/2# of N per app, then you would be OK with 7 steps.
  7. heritage

    heritage LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,268

    Ditto Grassmechanic :)

    Pete D.

    DAZED AND CONFUSED LawnSite Member
    Posts: 29

    shoild of been more specific my fault
    7 steps include
    earlyspring -- slow release granular fert
    -- pre- emergent crabgrass

    late spring -- slow release ganular fert
    -- merit!

    early summer -- slow release granular fert
    -- blanket broadleaf liquid
    -- spot crabgrass with post emirgent

    late summer -- slow release granular fert
    -- spot broadleaf

    fall -- slow release granular fert
    -- lime app

    the lime and blanket spray make the service a seven step app

    DAZED AND CONFUSED LawnSite Member
    Posts: 29

    one more thing high concentration of blue grass in my area would say 70%
    other 30% fescue possibly rye on new construction since that is what contractors up here favor
  10. Grassmechanic

    Grassmechanic LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,697

    Dazed - it still seems like a lot of N. for KBG and fescue. Also, the app. containing Merit, I would not apply that if there is no evidence of insect damage. I would not apply lime, unless soil test reveals a ph problem.

    Here is a program that I've used with great success on KBG and fescue.

    App 1. early spring - granular app. - Nutralene and Dimension

    App 2. late spring - liquid app. 1/2 # N and Millenium/Momentum

    App 3. mid summer - granular app 3/4# Nutralene

    App 4. early fall - granular app 3/4# of Nutralene. spot spray weeds if necessary

    App 5. late fall - granular app of 1# Nutralene and 1# of potash.

    The benefit of Dimesion is that you will not need to re-treat for crabgrass. The benefit of Nutralene is that you have a very slow release N source. If you have an insect problem, treat it seperately. If soil test shows lime deficiency, treat it seperately also. If soil test shows high ph, I'll substitute all nutralene apps for sulfur-coated urea.

    With a 5 step program, you are able to win more lawn bids because you are saving the homeowner money by not including unnecessary insecticide and lime apps. You can always sell those to your customers later, if they are needed.

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