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90psi at the bib

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by AceSprinkleRx, Sep 12, 2005.

  1. AceSprinkleRx

    AceSprinkleRx LawnSite Member
    from Wyoming
    Posts: 95

    Finally got most of my honey-do's done around the house, actually more like remodelling job's than "honey-do's" but....

    Between football games yesterday I slapped a static pressure gauge on one of our two hose bibs, one in front and one in the backyard. It read 90psi!

    Went down to the basement to see if there was a pressure regulator on the line and there isn't (new home purchase for us last Fall). With no flashlight handy I can make out what appears to be a 5/8" meter and 3/4" line coming into the house. Not sure as I really can't get back to it without trimming back some sheetrock in the furnace/water heater room.

    We'll be there a year this November and I have never had any plumbing issues nor heard or felt any water hammering. There is a dishwasher, washer/dryer too but not a long run of pipe either as the service lines enters in the center of the basement floor so it's centrally located within the home.

    Would you recommend a pressure regulator be installed? Is 90psi generally too high for residential plumbing? I'm certain the other houses in our neighborhood are similar to mine as they are built the same time within the development.

  2. Ground Master

    Ground Master LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 505

  3. jeffinsgf

    jeffinsgf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 641

    We used to own a home that was in "phase one" of a subdivision. We had phenomonal water pressure when we moved in. Didn't measure it, but I would guess that is was over 75 -- maybe as much as 90. By the time "phase three" was built out, it was way, way down.

    I would be surprised if you don't have a pressure regulator on your supply line. It usually is right at the entrance and is adjusted with a screwdriver (in is usually less, out is more).

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