A lil help. Whats on this Japanese Maple?

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by KrayzKajun, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. 44DCNF

    44DCNF LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,459

    Two or more different type of Epiphyte.
     
  2. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    Lichen is an Epiphyte
     
  3. 44DCNF

    44DCNF LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,459

    Yes, but not all Epiphytes are Lichen. I said it this way as I was not sure if the tendril growths in photo two were lichen or another form.

    Clear close up photos help when trying to ID life forms.
     
  4. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    Yes, and spanish moss is not a moss, or a lichen. Need a better pic, however I might venture the hairy growth is spanish moss.
     
  5. New2TheGreenIndustry

    New2TheGreenIndustry LawnSite Senior Member
    from GA
    Posts: 845

    It seems like most of the time I see this stuff, the plant is in horrible shape.
     
  6. TurfNut

    TurfNut LawnSite Member
    Posts: 10

    They are lichens on the tree you posted. They pose no real threat to the tree itself and produce their own food from air, moisture and light. The tree is not actually a host, just where they hangout

    Lichens need ample sun for photosynthesis to carry out. Here in MD I usually find them on the trunk on lower scaffolding branches where there is more light. On healthy trees with a full dense canopy, you probably will probably find none in the crown.

    I have heard folks hitting them with a copper based fungicide if they become a aesthetic issue. The only thing I can see as negative is they make an excellent overwintering ground for pests. I would monitor them harder next season.

    Ed
     
  7. New2TheGreenIndustry

    New2TheGreenIndustry LawnSite Senior Member
    from GA
    Posts: 845

    Is it pronounced lie-ken?
     
  8. 44DCNF

    44DCNF LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,459

    Yes, or actually lie-k (where's the backward upside down e-schwa) n

    them brits like to do things differently
    li┬Ěchen
    noun \ˈlī-kən, British also ˈli-chən\
     
  9. New2TheGreenIndustry

    New2TheGreenIndustry LawnSite Senior Member
    from GA
    Posts: 845

    As I mention before, From what I've seen, the more lichen, the worse off the plant. If it doesn't actually hurt the plant, I guess a sick plant makes a good host?

    Any certain conditions that make a good host?
     
  10. jds912

    jds912 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 84

    looks like a few air ferns as well. grow on all the trees around here. dont know if that is really the name, but thats what i have awlways heard/said.
     

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