A List Of Products For Organic.......

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by Norm Al, Sep 18, 2006.

  1. Norm Al

    Norm Al LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,227

    .....lawns.

    ok list the MAIN products needed for a successful turf shrub program.



    for the synthetic world all you need is

    fert liquid or granular
    fungicide
    insecticide; talstar
    herbicide

    lesco or any other pro can give the recipe for a synthetic lawn but who has the total package for an organic program?
     
  2. Norm Al

    Norm Al LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,227

    no wonder the organic world is misunderstood,,,,,theres no recipe for their products?
     
  3. Microbe

    Microbe LawnSite Member
    Posts: 172

    The organic world is misunderstood because lawn care professionals don't find it necessary to read about the true roots of their trade. If people took the 5 mins it takes to jump on the computer there are tons of "recipies," and many very very well made products that are for lawn and shrub care. I used K + Neem Soap with a non ionic vegetable oil sticker added and killed spider mites on the first appliction this year on a spreading yew. From experience I have been using just about %100 percent organic products or natural products on shrubs this year with great success. Sometimes it takes 2 or 3 applications but natural products which are very much safer than applying Seven Liquid on a shrub for mites really do work if applied correctly. You don't even have to worry about drift cause if a little bit gets you or an animal/insect/bird you its all good. The product can be applied the day before harvest on edible fruits......... There are recipies and products that work just as conviniently as chemical pesticides.
     
  4. Neal Wolbert

    Neal Wolbert LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 407

    Microbe,
    Did you get your hand lens out and see if you killed the beneficial mites with your spray? If not, you should go back and find out. Some organic insecticides, like oils and soaps, are broad spectrum and not selective. Maybe that's why you have to apply several times. Killing the beneficials will make your job as a sprayer a permanent one. I'm sure you don't want that. Have you looked into predator mite releases? That may be a more sure way of controlling mites and you don't have to spray as much, if at all. BTW Sevin is not a mitacide to start with, I don't believe.
    Neal
     
  5. Microbe

    Microbe LawnSite Member
    Posts: 172

    Probably wasn't a selective pesticide that I used, I'll have to check the lable "spelling." I noticed that there have been no webs since the spray of K + neem soap since I applied. I should thoroughly check it though. Predators to stop the mites is a fantastic idea but I don't know if the customers would be down for something like that. I have a few that might be interested I should ask. Killing beneficials is not a good thing I know, but if you have a bush that is infested with mites should you A - Use a synthetic selective product to kill the mites or should you use a natural less toxic form of control that will kill the mites and possibly hurt beneficials. But don't you think if there were beneficials that there wouldn't be mites infesting a yew then? Looks like the beneficials got wiped out? What do you think?
     
  6. Neal Wolbert

    Neal Wolbert LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 407

    All the more reason to use your hand lens. The good guys may be there but in low numbers so you've got to know what to look for. Other stresses like drought should be considered too. Spraying with a garden hose will slow them down for a little while without any pesticide. Selective mitacides like Floramite (adulticide) and Hexagon (ovicide) would be good choices too. Floramite is gentle on the good guys and hammers the bad guys in these parts. The combination works very well but is a bit spendy. Not sure what kind of bad guy mites you might have. Best to check with the manuf. for details.

    If you choose to release predators they will need some bad guys to eat, that's where the balance comes in. Evergreen Growers in Ore. is the insectiary we use for predator mites. The good guys we've used are inexpensive and easy to apply since they are bedded on bean leaves that you just attach to the plant.

    I think you can do the predator releases pretty reasonable and they should be popular with your clients. They really work for food and aren't looking for a handout:)
    Good hunting!
     
  7. Norm Al

    Norm Al LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,227

    since there are "tons of recipes" on the web,,,,,,post just one ok?
     

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