A question for mechanics/ Truck guys

Discussion in 'Mechanic and Repair' started by STIHL GUY, May 24, 2009.

  1. STIHL GUY

    STIHL GUY LawnSite Fanatic
    from CT
    Posts: 5,225

    I have a family member that owns an 1989 F250 pickup with 77,000 miles on the original engine. For the past couple of years it has been sitting out in his field not running. He said the head gasket is leaking and probably needs to be replaced, the brakes are shot but it may just be the brake lines, it needs new ball joints and a battery.
    I have a friend who is a mechanic who offered to help me fix it up and said we could get parts from the junkyard. my dad doesnt want me to do this because he thinks i will end up putting too much money into it if other things start to break.
    This is a really nice truck in pretty good shape and i really want to fix it up but i dont want it to be a total waste of money. Does anybody have an idea of how much the above listed parts would be for just the parts because my friend and i will be putting them in ourselves?? and is there a good chance of having major problems because of the trucks age?

    And by the way my family member offered the truck to me for free and doesnt think it would be too hard to fix it up
     
  2. Restrorob

    Restrorob LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,024

    Hmmm,

    Engine top-end gasket kit, NEW brake lines and NEW ball joints maybe 3-4 hundred. If the truck is being given to you can you buy a drivable truck in the same condition for 3-4 hundred ?

    By today's standards 77,000 miles is just getting broke in good.....
     
  3. STIHL GUY

    STIHL GUY LawnSite Fanatic
    from CT
    Posts: 5,225

    it seems like a good deal to me and i have the cash but my dad doesnt want another car in the driveway. He doesnt want me wasting money trying to keep it running but he admitted himself that its a really cool truck and he likes it too. Im trying my best to convince him
     
  4. 4.3mudder

    4.3mudder LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,227

    LOL, not a FORD!! It would be plum wore out. lol just kidding

    Vehicles hurt worst when they are not being driven rather than being driven. Seals dry up, dry rotting occurs, just my perspective.

    Your dad may be right, another vehicle to add to the gas and insurance bill.

    But, if you don't have a vehicle right now that is capable of suiting your needs, this might be your best shot at a cheap vehicle.

    Just remember this, whenever there comes a problem with that truck, it is circled on the front grill. :laugh:
     
  5. STIHL GUY

    STIHL GUY LawnSite Fanatic
    from CT
    Posts: 5,225

    right now i have a ranger but i just thought it would be a good deal on a bigger truck and it wont cost a fortune
     
  6. STIHL GUY

    STIHL GUY LawnSite Fanatic
    from CT
    Posts: 5,225

    and if it gets to be too expensive i could always put it on craigslist for a few hundred and break even. i have a ton of friends that want this truck for 4 wheeling and mudding so any one of them would buy it in a heart beat
     
  7. 4.3mudder

    4.3mudder LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,227

    It would make a great towing truck I would say that, maybe if you get this truck, get it going, and sell the ranger. Trade up, or actually upgrade.
     
  8. 4.3mudder

    4.3mudder LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,227

    That's the older body style too.
     
  9. STIHL GUY

    STIHL GUY LawnSite Fanatic
    from CT
    Posts: 5,225

    my dad would probably want to keep the ranger in case the F250 didnt work out. I am fine with selling it as long as i get the 250 running good. We also have a 18' bowrider and a pop up that the ranger does fine with but would be a lot easier with the 250. not to mention the amount of brush and leaves for cleanups i could fit in there. yes it is the older body style i love the way those look
     
  10. STIHL GUY

    STIHL GUY LawnSite Fanatic
    from CT
    Posts: 5,225

    the 250 would deffinitly handle a plow well and that would help to pay it off as well
     

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