A Regulation That Could Keep You From Mowing

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by Critical Care, Sep 9, 2006.

  1. Critical Care

    Critical Care LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,654

    I have a neighbor that works for the state forestry department and who keeps a brush firefighting engine on his property. Apparently he has the boring job of driving his thing around looking for problems, and from talking to his wife I was told that there is a regulation out here, that he could enforce, that could keep people from operating combustion engines after 11:00 am.

    “I never heard of such a thing” I told her, but she made the point that typically there isn’t a problem until someone is out running equipment in a place like a dry field. And not only that, but if some guy is mowing his lawn next door to a guy weedeating down his dry knee-high weeds, they both will be told to stop.

    Have any of you heard of anything like this?
     
  2. stumper1620

    stumper1620 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,889

    Under RED flag conditions it would'nt surprise me.
     
  3. ChadsLawn

    ChadsLawn LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,110

    Thank "mother nature" we dont have that problem down here.
     
  4. ECS

    ECS LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,732

    I would be suprised if anyone who is contracted out for the state forest division would have any athority over what is being done on private property. The fact that he is using his own truck tells me he is just contracted out during the fire season.
     
  5. Critical Care

    Critical Care LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,654

    No, the fire fighting "brush truck" is a state vehicle, complete with the red lights, siren, and emblem on the side. But yeah, I was still thinking the same thing about what authority this guy would have.

    I noticed something on the Internet that defined what the forest land was, and it wasn't just state property, but adjoining similar land as well. So, if that's the case, then it could be that the forestry department could stop you from burning down the forest with your weedeater even on your own land. Ugh!

    If you live nextdoor to a state or federal forest, the eye in the sky could be watching you.
     
  6. hosejockey2002

    hosejockey2002 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,195

    The forestry guys don't enact such restrictions on power equipment usage because they enjoy telling you what you can do on your private property. They do it because right now in your area fuel moistures are at historical lows. Fuel moistures in the morning are higher, so that's why the 11:00 AM restriction. Now, if you are just mowing an irrigated lawn in town, common sense I'm sure will prevail and no one will bother you. But if you're brushhogging a dry field a 3 in the afternoon on a windy day then you're an idiot.:hammerhead: If your blade were to hit a rock or other debris a fire could easily be started. If you start a fire because of your negligence and the fire escapes your property, you can be held liable for suppression costs. If the fire grows large, these costs can easily run in the millions.
     
  7. jsf343

    jsf343 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,767

    Hey CC (fellow Oregonian) I can only see it happening in this crazy state.
    some of the goofy rules, and laws here have no hint of common sense including that one if it is true. Not surprised to hear about something like that at all. Be glad your not on this side of the cascades! Lunacy runs amuk!(sp?)
     
  8. Armadillolawncare

    Armadillolawncare LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 570

    Aren't cars combustion engines?;)
     
  9. Critical Care

    Critical Care LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,654

    Sure, at least most are, and there have been a number of fires started by hot catalytic converters. By far, most fires out here have been started by lightning or arson.

    Here is another thing that happened to a crew that was working in one of the private forested subdivisions near here. They were stopped because their weedeaters didn’t have fire screens on them. I guess you wouldn’t want a spark to catch the 13’th fairway on fire, would you?
     
  10. The Captain

    The Captain LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 607

    I have to agree with hosejockey2002. This is just common sense when fire dangers are high.

    The Captain
     

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