a tale of 2 jobs

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by bobbygedd, May 9, 2006.

  1. bobbygedd

    bobbygedd LawnSite Fanatic
    from NJ
    Posts: 10,178

    don't even try and tell me you never measured wrong, or ever screwed up the math. as for me, my measurements are dead nuts perfect, every time, always have been, until this week.....i screwed up 2 jobs in a row. the first job, was landscaping work. i OVER calculated by 2 yds of topsoil, and 2 yds of mulch. that's 4 YARDS, that i over charged him for @ $75 per yd. i overcharged by $300. the second job, was a sod job. i measured it at 1800 sq ft + 10% over for a total of 1980 sq ft @ $1.25 per sq and charged him $2475. i screwed THAT ONE up too. the actual sq footage was 2300 sq ft. the job should have been charged 2300 sq ft + 10% over= 2530 sq ft @ $1.25 per sq for a total of $3162.50. it's been a rough few weeks, and i don't know how i screwed up my math, but i did. how would you rectify both of these situations?
     
  2. mike lane lawn care

    mike lane lawn care LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,707

    well, do you have the 4 yards of material that was overcharged or was it just a math error in the pricing? if you can return the materails, then give the $300 back to the customer. if you can't then still return the money, then use the material at a job elsewhere.

    on the second one, if you can(i don't know if the price you gave the customer was an estimate or a bid) re-write the bill and he accepts it(just explain the situation), then problem solved. if you can't change the price, then eat the price and move on.
     
  3. newz7151

    newz7151 LawnSite Silver Member
    from Tejas
    Posts: 2,419

    Well, first off.. what's done is done.. probably going to have to stick to it.

    and second.. get a calculator.. using your fingers and toes to figure big numbers like that is messing you up.
     
  4. MJM

    MJM LawnSite Member
    Posts: 48

    Yes we all screw up measurements.

    First scenario: You over bid the job. Client accepted the bid, you performed as contract specified, client happy ......Exactly why I do not tell clients how long a job will take... only the final result. If they agree on a price and are satisfied with the results... then what time and what your cost is irrelavent!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! No refund!!

    Second scenario: Simple: U #@!& the bid. If you performed everything that was specified in the contract and it took you longer than anticipated, it is on you. No extra charge!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Mark
     

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