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Above ground irrigation

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by bicmudpuppy, Apr 22, 2005.

  1. bicmudpuppy

    bicmudpuppy LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,781

    Guess I'm bored tonight. I've seen a lot of posts about hard ground and watering sod, etc. I'm going to share my secret to above ground watering.

    Irritrol CR500 on a lawn stake with a .5 gpm nozzle ran in series at 30' intervals and attached to a hose bib timer. The timer of choice for me is the cheapy from Home Depot that runs about $30. If your in an area with average to good pressure (60-80 psi), you can run 6-8 of these on one hose bib. For sod, set the timer to run 3x per day for 3 hours per run. After the first week, start cutting the water back. 2x per day, then once per day and then every other day. When you are having good luck w/ every other day, tell the home owner how much you want for your system and timers and either sell them or pick them up and move on to the next job.

    For non sod applications (hard ground) set up the system about a week before you plan to work. Let the timer run for 3 hours per day for 3 days in a row. Then remove the system to the next scheduled site. Also, take you a 1/2" auger bit on a good cordless drill to make holes for the lawn stakes :)

    Set up this way, the CR500 from irritrol will throw nearly 30' and will be adequate for good coverage. If you have a large enough area for full circle heads, put the 1 gpm nozzle in and count it twice. The CR500 will seat and "pop up" at less than 30psi
    If you have a high pressure area, you can run 10 or more of these on one bib
  2. Critical Care

    Critical Care LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,654

    Umm... you can get 60-80 psi through a straw, but may not have enough water for a couple of heads. The .5 nozzles are small and shouldn't present a problem with water volume, but the point is that it may always be wise to check the rate of flow through the hose before automatically adding on more heads. I wonder what the velocity factor would be in a 1/2" garden hose?

    This post is a bit like some in the past where guys have discussed putting together portable irrigation systems that they could set up at a clients place after hydroseeding.

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