Additional Pressurized Line?

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by jeffinsgf, Mar 14, 2008.

  1. jeffinsgf

    jeffinsgf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 641

    I guess I should have asked this question before I remodeled my system, but it occurred to me as I was gluing up the last few joints.

    I added about 350 feet of pressurized main line to my existing system, which was working nicely. Will the additional pressurized line have any effect on the overall operation of the system? It would seem to me that it would not have any effect, but I'm not a hydraulic engineer...heck I'm not even an irritator.

    Have I screwed up or am I creating a problem in my mind that doesn't really exist? I'm going to open up the system, flush the lines and test everything tomorrow, but I thought I would give you all a chance to tell me what I might expect.
     
  2. Dirty Water

    Dirty Water LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,794

    Think of it this way, by adding mainline you have potentially lengthened the amount of pipe that water must travel through to reach the sprinklers. This will introduce additional friction loss for those zones.

    However, if you ran a new line of pipe, and did not lengthen any existing zones, then having extra mainline will not effect your existing zones at all. Think of it as a larger pressure tank :)
     
  3. jeffinsgf

    jeffinsgf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 641

    The second scenario is what I've done. I put a compression tee on the mainline right after the DBCVA, then ran the new line around to the raised bed gardens in the back yard and then up the hill to my barn and added a couple of faucets. I did not increase the run to the old zones in any way.
     
  4. hoskm01

    hoskm01 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,690




    Oh well. That will be a fun fix in a few years. Otherwise sounds like a good upgrade.
     
  5. jeffinsgf

    jeffinsgf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 641

    Hey, it hasn't been backfilled yet. I take it you would have done 4 90's and a tee? I assumed that the extra turns would be more disruptive to the flow and pressure. Is the compression tee that likely to fail?
     
  6. hoskm01

    hoskm01 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,690

    On a mainline, I would say it is the least desirable solution. You tee'd the existing mainline to run another, right? If it were feasible, I would uncover some of your existing mainline, maybe 5 feet in each direction, to give flexion to simply install a standard SxSxS tee. What size is the pipe?


    Edit:
    Thinking bout it now, if you've already cut in the comp tee, you might have too wide a gap for a standard tee with good penetration. Maybe just enough, youd have to determine.
     
  7. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    Agreed, but why both directions? I think he is dealing with 1" if memory serves me correctly?

    nothing a coupling won't fix.
     
  8. jeffinsgf

    jeffinsgf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 641

    1" Class 200. This is not fluffy, clean, pretty topsoil. This is rocks held tenaciously together by red clay, with the faint hint of developed topsoil in the top three inches. Digging out 10 feet, 18 inches deep would involve several hours of work. If the compression tee fails in a few years, I'll deal with it then.

    EDIT:

    Jeez that sounds lame. Seriously, you guys just really screwed up my afternoon.

    Thanks.
     
  9. hoskm01

    hoskm01 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,690

    Class pipe would be a bit easier, more "bendy." You dont neccesarily need to dig out in both directions, but enough to be able to get your pipes to bend enough (without breaking) so that you can get the tee (installed on one end) onto the other end of mainline. Hey, maybe you sell in a year and you'll never see the thing again, but if you have the oppourtunity now, I'd go for it.
     
  10. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    Then put in a union.
     

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