advice for low pressure

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by TriplePLandscaping, Jul 21, 2005.

  1. TriplePLandscaping

    TriplePLandscaping LawnSite Member
    Posts: 166

    installing an irrigation system for a house the has approx 1600sqft front 1800sqft sides and 3200sqft backyard. the way the driveway is arched around the front of the house and with all the beds we will be using a 6-8 zone system, 1 for the front, 1 for the treelawn, 1 for each side lot, 1 for the back(possible be split into 2 zones, yard is 80x20) and with 2 zones covering 3 beds. the problem is that berea, ohio has low water pressure b/c the systems are soo old, they have tried to raise the pressure and have broken water mains. any advice as to how we can make this more efficient and easier. we already have to use a mole or horizontal boring machine in 5 areas to get under the drive and a few sidewalks around the house.
  2. mowerman111

    mowerman111 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 327

    MP rotators nozzles for all the lawn areas. I use them in my yard and I have 35 psi they are the only thing that I have found that works.
  3. GreenscapesofWestMichigan

    GreenscapesofWestMichigan LawnSite Member
    Posts: 16

    use a booster pump.....easy to install works great.....hook it right to the city water line, run it with a pump relay off your master valve switch on your timer. we use them all the time..... rotors are awsome we use maybe a 100 per week but the dont solve a low pressure problem only hide it and may actually cause different problems.....

    Erik Green
    owner Greenscapes of West Michigan
  4. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,713

    There were some old-fashioned methods of dealing with low supply pressures that can still work today. Besides the booster pump and low-gallonage heads, there are the heads that will function reliably at low pressure, and give good coverage. The positive aspect of low-pressure heads is lower operating cost, compared to a booster pump, and heavier coverage, compared to low-gallonage heads. The negative aspect of low-pressure heads is reduced spray distance. That means closer spacing and more sprinkler heads. Because they aren't as reliable as sealed-case rotors, I hesitate to include Rainbird Maxipaw impact heads in the low-pressure family (and they can spray further at low pressures than a sealed-case rotor) but there were times when they were the only effective solution for the (limited homeowner budget) money.

    Because of their Rain Curtain nozzles, and manually adjustable stator, to alter rotation speed, I would consider a Rainbird R-50 ball drive rotor the most capable of effective coverage at low (less than 30 psi) pressures.

    Or you could do the entire job with all-brass popup mist heads! Operation at 20psi :p
  5. Mdirrigation

    Mdirrigation LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,640

    Or you can do something a bit easier , more zones , less heads per zone .
  6. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,713

    Without knowing the static pressure, it's all somewhat speculative. At 40 psi static, it's kind of difficult to get much done with standard operating procedure.
  7. Broker

    Broker LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 382

    We have installed 5 systems in berea this summer along with doing the median infront of BWC and the schools you do not need any special design for berea just design given the pipe and meter at the house.
  8. gotgreen?

    gotgreen? LawnSite Member
    Posts: 45

  9. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,713

    <a href=>Read this thread on booster pumps</a> - depending on your water supply, you should get that pressure, no problem.
  10. sheshovel

    sheshovel LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,112

    Install drip irrigation to all zones but the lawn zones.
    Don't install more than you can properly water.

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