Aera-vator, anyone have one?

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by qball98, Sep 16, 2006.

  1. qball98

    qball98 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 83

    Thinking about buying an aera-vator for my Grasshopper 928D. I have a couple of questions if anyone here has one.

    1.) How well do you like it compared to core aerating. I like the idea of being able to use it on dry and rocky soil if it really works.

    2.) How well would it work for over-seeding and sod installations.

    3.) Since it does not pull cores will it still damage things like phone and cable lines if hits them.

    4.) Trying to decide between the 60 or 40 inch wide one. How hard is it to get the 60 inch in tight places.


    I have never seen a lawn that has had one used on it but my dealer claims you can see amazing results but then again he is trying to sell me one. Any input would be appreciated.

    Thanks
     
  2. MJB

    MJB LawnSite Silver Member
    from Wa
    Posts: 2,869

    What do they cost ??? I thought about getting one years ago but seems they are to expensive.
     
  3. rider

    rider LawnSite Member
    from ohio
    Posts: 152

    if it's not pulling cores all it is doing is compacting the soil
     
  4. TURF DOCTOR

    TURF DOCTOR LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,138

    Last check over 4k
     
  5. lx665

    lx665 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 147

    I have the Seed-Vator and love it. It fractures the soil and works great in rock hard clay. The results that I have from overseeding are excellent.

    John
     
  6. muddstopper

    muddstopper LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,342

    Before making such a statement, you should try the areovator out. I own one and it will do much more for relieveing compacton that a core areator ever will.
    For overseeding, you must broadcast the seed first, before areovating. The long vibrateing tines will fracture the soil in all directions instead of just pulling a liitle plug leaving a hole. The vibration of the tines will work the seed, as well as any amendments, into the soil. My opinion is the areovator is the best overseeding tool available, next to using an actual seed drill. Certainly better than slit seeding and a lot easier.

    Grasshopper makes an areovator attachment that hooks to the front of the machine, they also have a seedbox attachment that sets on top of the areovator so you can overseed at the same time you areovate. A little pricy, but worth every penny if you do lots of lawns. The key is to try and not go to fast so the areovator tines have time to fracture the soil. The machine works better in dry soil than it does wet soil.

    My machine is a tow behind from First Products. First Products also makes the one for the grasshopper as well as the Ventrac. the attachment is easy to manuver, much easier than the tow behind models but you cant do zero turns, it destroys the vibrating assemblies. It is also very Fast. I have done as many as 4 acres in four hours, areovating, seeding spreading lime ,and broadcasting fertilizer, about one hour per acre. And thats with no help, just myself. That was with the Ventrac 60 inch attachment, which I demoed before buying the tow behind. I wish I had spent the extra and got the attachment.
     
  7. ant

    ant LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,442

    i have one f/s.
    it worked well . i bought it new to loosen 22 lawns in a row. the soil was so hard that my areators would not enter the soil. after using the aerovator i now can use the core aerators.
     
  8. mowtime

    mowtime LawnSite Member
    Posts: 79

    I bought one at a local school system auction for $79.00, Believe it or not. just needed to be greased and the belts tightened. Works very good at loosening red clay and for hardpan areas. Does anyone have the seeder attachment for this. This is used with the core aerators and pull behind 6' slit seeder as a premium seeding package. Has anyone replaced the tines on this mine are needing to be replaced soon.
     
  9. qball98

    qball98 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 83

    My dealer gave me one to demo for a couple of days but I have only played with it for a few minutes so far. What I have noticed so far is you have to go fairly slow for it to penetrate the full length of the tines. From looking at it all it seems to do is make a hole in the ground like a spike aerator but maybe it is doing more and I just can't see it. If anyone has any more opinions I would like to hear them because I have not really decided what I think of it yet.

    Thanks
     
  10. FINN

    FINN LawnSite Senior Member
    from PA.
    Posts: 280

    The Aeravator is designed to penetrate the soil and create a lateral fracture between "penetrations". The drier the ground the better the "fracture".

    I recently purchased the SEEDAVATOR. It's very much like the AERAVATOR with a larger seed box and rear roller. Both are available as options with the AERAVATOR but not as large and the optional roller is smooth. The rear roller on the SEEDAVATOR has "spikes" and is much larger.

    Do I like? So far. It's very productive. I think you have to be careful about how deep you set the tine depth. I recently did some ball fields and sourrounding areas in a local park. I'm concerned the seed may have been pushed too deep for optimum germination.

    It's a heavy unit and you need a tractor that can handle it.
     

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