aerating

Discussion in 'Homeowner Assistance Forum' started by Capemay Eagle, Apr 19, 2008.

  1. Capemay Eagle

    Capemay Eagle LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,750

    A question for anyone knowledgeable about aerating.

    I just seeded and fertilized my yard and everything is good, I am on my third cut and it has greened up nice. I was thinking that maybe I should aerate. Can I do it know that my lawn is just freshly seeded and growing or should I wait till late summer??. I think I read somewhere that seasonal lawns should be aerated in August. I have never core aerated my lawn, but I think it really needs it. It looks like a golf course all spring and early summer but It tends to die out in the late summer. Any suggestions
     
  2. Steve Swail

    Steve Swail LawnSite Member
    Posts: 53

    Hell, I don't know if I'm particularly "knowledgeable" about the aeration process but I'm bored & will throw in my two cents on the subject. Yes, aeration is a vital key to the health of your lawn (something to do with helping the roots of the grass & reducing compaction of the soil). From the way you described your yard (looks best in spring & early summer) I'll guess you have Tall Type Turf Fescue growing. Some would say it's important to aerate both in the spring & fall, but I would say the fall is the most critical since that's when most of us with TTTF lawns overseed them. Make sure you use a true plugger type machine & not some half-assed pull behind yard tractor deal that just pushes holes down in the ground & compacts the soil even more. Make multiple passes with the aerator also in different directions. And, if you use a rotary spreader I'd wait several days or for a rain to break up the plugs & fill in the holes a little or you can end up with a patchy look. I've heard of guys who have aerated & then slit seeded on the same day with good results but I've never tried to seed that way. Anyway, simple answer is "Yeah, you need to aerate at least once a year...."
     
  3. Capemay Eagle

    Capemay Eagle LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,750

    Thanks for the tips. I do have tall Fescue with about 20% Kentucky blue. My only concern is that I seeded about 3 1/2 weeks ago and I still have seed germinating. It took awhile this year to germinate, since we were under clouds in the 50's with rain for a week and a half. I just want to make sure that aerating on a newly seeded lawn will be ok for the new roots. I think I might just hire someone if I can find them.
     
  4. dcgreenspro

    dcgreenspro LawnSite Senior Member
    from PA
    Posts: 688

    It would have been nice to aerate before you overseeded. I would not touch the lawn till the first or second week of Sept. Take a soil test in august and send it in for full analysis that way if your soil needs some amendments, you can aerate and put them down while the ground is still open. Go Birds!
     
  5. Steve Swail

    Steve Swail LawnSite Member
    Posts: 53

    I agree....I know you're kinda itching to aerate now but I'd wait until the early fall when you can overseed after you aerate. If you do it now you are definitely going to kill some of the new growth you've got coming. Be patient & wait til the fall....
     
  6. jeffinsgf

    jeffinsgf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 641

    Though I am a proponent of Spring aerating, I wouldn't do it on a freshly seeded lawn.
     
  7. Capemay Eagle

    Capemay Eagle LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,750

    Thanks guys. I know I should have done this before I seeded, but I really did not think of it till now. I will just wait till the fall and give it a shot then. I just thought that I have read on here that some guys aerate a few times a year and some have said that they arerate mid summer. I guess that different grass and climates come in to this.
     
  8. jeffinsgf

    jeffinsgf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 641

    I aerate several times a year. The issue in your situation is the age of the seedlings. I would avoid any kind of heavy traffic until the grass has been mown several times.
     

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