Aeration Question

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by Premo Services, Aug 23, 2001.

  1. Premo Services

    Premo Services LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,516

    I will be doing aerations this season, and I have a question. One of my customers did some extensive sod work in June. When can new sod be aerated? Also what would be the benifits of aerating new sod, I know that some of it has died in spots, that will benefit, but what about the healthy sod?
     
  2. Eric ELM

    Eric ELM Husband, Father, Friend, Angel
    Posts: 4,831

    It will stimulate root growth by getting air, water, and fertilizer down to the roots on an established lawn. I've never aerated a newly sodded lawn though, so I can't tell you the results, but it would seem like it would be the same as an established lawn. Developing roots is very important with sod.
     
  3. Premo Services

    Premo Services LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,516

    I will be aerating the rest of his lawn, and he wants me to do the sod also, but I don`t know if it will hurt the sod. I don`t want to have to replace all that sod. :confused:
     
  4. Chuck Sinclair

    Chuck Sinclair LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 336

    You say it was put in in june, and you will areate in September or October no problem doing it then it should be well rooted by then.
     
  5. Well mow money you might have a problem with the sod rolling up in the aerater. The roots are going to be the only thing holding it down. I would think your best bet is to go around it and wait till next spring to aerate it.

    PS I would like to hear what others say on this.

    LGF:blob1:
     
  6. HBFOXJr

    HBFOXJr LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,712

    If it doesn't hold now there is a big fertility problem. We're talking months here, not weeks.

    The roots of the turf are always the only things that holds it down, except for gravity or atmospheric pressure. But I like roots best.

    Grab a hold of a chunk of good stuff and see if it pulls up.
     
  7. Premo Services

    Premo Services LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,516

    LGF That was one of my concerns, pulling the sod up with the aerator.



    If it doesn't hold now there is a big fertility problem.
    We're talking months here, not weeks.
    The roots of the turf are always the only things that holds it down, except for gravity or atmospheric pressure.
    But I like roots best.

    Grab a hold of a chunk of good stuff and see if it pulls up.
     
  8. HBFOXJr

    HBFOXJr LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,712

    Lets logic this out a little more. The sod was "established" before it was cut and relocated. It is now firmly rooted and will not pull up.

    What possible harm could be done??? My vote would have been to aerate it and keeping growing strong.
     
  9. racerdave

    racerdave LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 260

    I don't understand.
    The sod was installed in June. and I'm sure it's well established, but whats the point of aerating it now? If all the prep work was done correctly, wouldn't it be good for 1 or 2 seasons before this is needed? I would sure try to talk to the owner about the need for this. Perhaps the owner will still want it done, but never the less, he should know.

    It's probably just me. I hate doing unnecessary work., or doing work over....whether being paid or not..

    BTW If the customer insists, I would do it. But I would not guarantee that the sod would be ok.

    David
     
  10. MOW ED

    MOW ED LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,028

    I agree with racerdave, I wouldn't aerate it unless it has been severely compacted over its short life. I believe if you talk to the customer and educate him you will build a better relationship and secure many jobs in the future. Definately aerate the established turf for all the reasons stated above but I'd leave the sod until next year. Just my 2.
     

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