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Aluminum Spindle Housings

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by Eric ELM, May 4, 2001.

  1. Eric ELM

    Eric ELM Husband, Father, Friend, Angel
    Posts: 4,831

    Does anybody know why some Mfgs have gone to Aluminum Spindle Housings?
    This is not a quiz. :)
    This is a question I have never heard the answer to.
  2. joshua

    joshua LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,226

    i think i have it. why do some contractors sell people the cheaper brown mulch that lasts 1 year instaed of the black died mulch? answer so they have to mulch it more often and make more money. if the mfgs put all the best stuff that wouldn't break on our machines we wouldn't have to replace it.
  3. awm

    awm LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,354

    i ask this on another post that mentioned aluminum spindles. is this w cast or steel sleeve.
    my lazer is 5 yrs old with original spindles,if they can get aluminum to do that. cant be aluminum im familar with.
    i know a fella that changes all spindles, i think he said every yr.mabe thats why.
    ill be interested in reading other input on this .later
  4. 75

    75 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 992

    With the trend these days towards making everything lighter, I'm inclined to think aluminum spindle housings are a way to save weight - in the same way that by using lighter gauge metal and more plastic, a 1/2-ton pickup from '85 weighs less than the comparable '75 model.
    (And a LOT less than a '65!)

    Just a thought.
  5. awm

    awm LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,354

    i was picturing an auminum bearing but you said housi
    so that dont sound that bad. the bearing its self is steel i guess.
  6. Eric ELM

    Eric ELM Husband, Father, Friend, Angel
    Posts: 4,831

    AWM, as I mentioned in my reply to you on that thread, it has to be aluminum spindle housings, not aluminum spindle shafts. In the above question of mine I did say aluminum HOUSINGS. I think Exmark went to this just a few years ago, yours are probably steel housings. The aluminum housings I know of are all the sealed bearing type spindles.
  7. thelawnguy

    thelawnguy LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,412

    My tuf tracer is 5 years old w/ aluminum spindles the center has been replaced but outboard are original.

    What is the concern, if they can make engines from aluminum (the one in your mower probably is) I dont see where a spindle would be a problem.
  8. ChadsLawn

    ChadsLawn LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,110

    my spindles on my Kees ZTR 52" are aluminum housing sealed.They will last along time if you keephem away from sand and not hit any hiddin objects.My mower is 3yrs old and i have replaced all 3,4 times.Thank GOD for warranty.
    I personally think they made them aluminum so they will wear out faster.This last set has lasted me well over a year,but i dont mow 50 yards a week either.1200 hours on a 3 yr old mower is pretty good right???
  9. linky

    linky LawnSite Member
    Posts: 151

    The bearing and race are the only wear parts of a spindle. So maybe they use aluminum for weight and heat reduction. Just a guess but steel sounds better to me.
  10. Grateful11

    Grateful11 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 177

    Aluminum well dissipate heat faster than steel or cast iron. That may be one reason but I'm sure it's cheaper to cast aluminum than cast iron.

    OT: The only spindle failure I've had was when my wife hit a 1/2" rod 5ft long and bent the center spindle on my old Sears before I started mowing for others. I took it to work, disassembled it, made a new shaft out of 4150 preheat-treated steel and bored the housing deeper to accept a double row bottom bearing. The bent shaft wallowed out the end of the housing and we had to do something. So we put Loctite Quickmetal in the gap around the wallowed out area and seated the wider bearing into the newly bored area. That was many years ago and it's still going strong. I use it like a bush hog in rough stuff. At that time a new center shaft was $85.00 from Sears.

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