Am I aerating deep enough?

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by TAZ, Sep 30, 2007.

  1. TAZ

    TAZ LawnSite Senior Member
    from Ohio
    Posts: 344

    I just starting aerating this week. The ground around here is clay based and with the lack of rain was like cement up until we got 3/4 of rain last week. I had allot of weight on the unit and it seemed to be pulling consistent 2- 2 1/2" cores. The ground is still hard though. I dunno if I should add more weight, hold off a bit as more rain is forecast for later in the week or if I am going deep enough.

    My question is on the average hard to medium ground how deep of plug are you guys actually pulling?

    All these aerators claim 3 1/2" to 4" capability but I rarely see any plugs on mine or other peoples lots that deep. Most are in the 2"-3" range.

    -TAZ
     
  2. mojob

    mojob LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 515

    What brand of aerator claims 3 1/2 - 4" plugs?
     
  3. ExclusiveLawnCare

    ExclusiveLawnCare LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 304

    If your seeing plugs that are 2- 2 1/2" thats pretty good Taz. And yeah what aerator are you using?
     
  4. Scarlawnturf

    Scarlawnturf LawnSite Member
    Posts: 103

    I see this talked about all the time. I don't care if your punching good holes or not, if you are in a dry spell, like we're in here in Maryland, you shouldn't be aerating until there's a good stretch of rain. If you aerate and it doesn't rain for a couple of weeks, you'll do more damage than you can imagine. I've only aerated my customers that have irrigation or that are watering. Everyone else is on hold. October is still plenty good for aeration and seeding in the Transition Zone.This comes from experience working at the golf course for a number of years. I've seen parts of the rough aerated where there is no irrigation and without rain it turns to hardpan much faster than if it were left alone. Being able to punch good holes is only part of the equation. I keep my eye on the weather channel before I commit to my fall aerations. I make sure that plenty of rain is coming afterward as well. Just my 2 cents from personal experience.
     
  5. TAZ

    TAZ LawnSite Senior Member
    from Ohio
    Posts: 344

    Turf-Vent....
     
  6. TAZ

    TAZ LawnSite Senior Member
    from Ohio
    Posts: 344

    The just claim maximum coring depth..... most claim that in that range.

    -TAZ
     
  7. TAZ

    TAZ LawnSite Senior Member
    from Ohio
    Posts: 344

    We are not really coming out of a dry spell.... Yes the ground is hard but that is the way it is here most of the summer. the turf here is in good shape and rain is forecast for the first 3 days this week... ;)
    -TAZ
     
  8. avnorm

    avnorm LawnSite Member
    Posts: 43

    TAZ,

    See turfcobob's response in the thread "Tine Replacement on aerator."

    ....Says 1.5" is okay for most lawn grasses, as long as thatch is no more than 0.5".

    I'm waiting for my Turf-Aire aerator - anyday now.

    My thatch was about 0.25", but layered firmly over 17 years of mowing. I wondered how water seeped thru to my clay-like ground, especially on 5-6% slope. I have dethatched twice a week apart for something to do. One day I criss-crossed at 90 degrees; next time, back & forth on same strip. Both were very productive, but 1st attempt wasn't adequate.

    Drought has stressed, if not singed fescue in sporadic areas. So over-seeding will be final step.
     
  9. TAZ

    TAZ LawnSite Senior Member
    from Ohio
    Posts: 344

    Yeah I read that. The thing I was a little confused about is the university studies indicate that compaction that aerations ellivatiates is in the top 4" of soil. that combined with the specs on the units i was unsure of the depth required to be benificial.

    The drought here this summer hit the bluegrass hard also which with the conditions of the lawns has gotten me into aerations. I am seeing people do it that have never in the past. It's a growing market.
    -TAZ
     
  10. avnorm

    avnorm LawnSite Member
    Posts: 43

    I hear you on that.

    My guess is that the aeration process biannually and over time loosens the soil as good as possible (short of an earthquake).

    I see a huge difference between my home Club golf course and the municipal course. The muni just started aerating last year after 30 yrs of benign neglect. Their season this year was much more enjoable, despite the drought, because of their new practices. But it is a LONG way to the loamy soil of the Club.

    Time, good overall management, and worms.... Kidding aside, that's why I don't like the insecticides.
     

Share This Page