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An Idea who's time has come

Discussion in 'Florida Lawn Care Forum' started by Ric, Aug 4, 2012.

  1. DMlandscaping

    DMlandscaping LawnSite Member
    Posts: 27

    Again, I agree with diamondlandscaping. I'm new to this forum, but NOT new to forums, so online "debates" don't interest me in the least. If you just want to be a mow-n-go, then so be it. We have never been "just" that, and we have our sights set a little higher in S. FL. too. That plan could fail, but it won't be because we didn't try. It is what it is. Prepare for failure, and celebrate the victory! LOL!
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2012
  2. The companies I'm talking of have been around for at least 15 years...one of them 32...sure, looks can be deceiving, but there is a reason these companies ONLY work in one area...it is very profitable. How big are the ranches you maintain??
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  3. zturncutter

    zturncutter LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,308

    One of the ranches was over 50 square miles, some of it has been sold off over the last several years. We have to drive 3 miles across the property to mow the 11.5 acres that we maintain. Honestly don't know the current size of the property.
     
  4. Damn...that's nice...is it nice $$??? I'd love to get a property like that here.
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  5. zturncutter

    zturncutter LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,308

    Yes it is :clapping: .
     
  6. TX Easymoney

    TX Easymoney LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,063

    Agree with above--over 30 years in the business--perfection is fine as long as you are being compensated for it-
    - the higher the price, the higher the stress and demands and I have'nt been able to be able to justify the difference-
    --seems like the industry is trending toward people becoming more thrify, not less
    I see just as many rusty, hobbled up riggs taking care of commercial, and residential as I see slick riggs-
    -most people here don't come outside and want to see what's happening-- they want you to do the work and get outta dodge so they can go on living their lives with the least disruption-
    more power to you for the high end customers--not my bag
     
  7. Ric

    Ric LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,946

    IMHO It is an EGO thing. We all want to be the best. Then reality finally set in. Took a few years. My Numbers are a lot lower but I have more jingle in my pocket now. My expenses are a lot lower and my Bottom line is fine. I realize now because I was charging big money I was spending more time on details. I was charging more and making less. Now I am charging less and making more.

    .
     
  8. DMlandscaping

    DMlandscaping LawnSite Member
    Posts: 27

    I don't think there is a right or wrong market to pursue, it has a lot to do with where you're marketing. In my area, the middle class neighborhoods are paying ridiculously low prices. I don't know how some of these lawn services stay in business, except for the fact that they don't have fancy new equipment, and they keep their overhead low. I live in what I consider an "upper" middle class neighborhood, nothing fancy, but it's clean and everyone has their properties in nice shape. All of the properties here are around .4 acres, and the highest price anyone is paying is $20 per week for a cut, trim, edge, blow, and basic tree pruning. I just can't afford to compete with that, and I don't intend to. I have a good friend that is fairly well off financially, has about a .5 mil. home, sitting on about the same size property as ours. She pays her current service $65 per service, and say's they are one of the less expensive services in the area. Anyway, in MY area, it doesn't make any sense to compete with all the lowballers, when I can drive another mile up the road and find someone who doesn't mind paying a little extra for a quality job, and a company with a neat and clean appearance. I'm basically following the same business profile my partner in Tampa did, and adjusting for the area. Granted, I could be wrong, but I won't know if I don't try.
     
  9. Ric

    Ric LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,946

    .

    I don't think Harvard Business College could say it any better. One of their big advantage is knowing what to reseach in a Market. But the bottom line is the more you know about your market the better able you are to have a sucessful business plan.

    It is a bad time to be a start up business of any kind. The problem with the green Industry is every out of work guy is cutting grass. They just roll out the mower with no Marketing or business plan. Because they have no real marketing plan when they finally bid a job it is too cheap. Knowing this becomes part of your marketing plan and build your business to compete with it by being more professional. That doesn't mean full service.

    Now my Mow & Go is actually Spray & Go or Fire Ant Control. I work the same middle class neighborhoods. Only exception is I now spray NON IRRIGATED yards instead of Fert & Squirt on Irrigated Fine Yards.

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  10. DMlandscaping

    DMlandscaping LawnSite Member
    Posts: 27

    Too bad you're on the west coast, I need to network with a reputable spray op. Speaking of that, if anyone here is in PBC doing pest control, PM me. I have a couple I'm thinking about, but nothing is carved in stone yet.
     

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